Introduction

Seaweek 2011 in the Northland region will feature a roadshow from photographer Dr Roger Grace, education workshops based on the popular End of the Line movie, a free community snorkel day and a participatory workshop for schools.

New Zealand’s national, annual celebration of the sea is set on a strong course for Northland.

With this year’s theme of the culture, history and traditions of the sea, Seaweek in the region will feature a roadshow of his years with Greenpeace from photographer Dr Roger Grace, education workshops based on the popular End of the Line movie, a free community snorkel day and a participatory workshop for schools hosted by One Tree Point School.

The theme is designed to raise awareness of the wide range of uses and values of the ocean, says Northland regional co-ordinator Sioux Campbell.

“It incorporates everything from the relationship different cultures have with the sea to maritime history, practices such as whaling and also recreation. All these things have a strong background in Northland and we’d like to help people understand their interactions with the sea better through Seaweek activities.”

Dr Grace has a long association with the region through many years of marine research and photography. The idea of sharing two decades of his work with Greenpeace aims to provide a public window into the world of marine education and advocacy.

“Seaweek isn’t about telling people what’s right or wrong. It’s about providing opportunities and insights for everyone with an interest in the sea and offering a chance to learn more,” Mrs Campbell says. “Last year hundreds of Northlanders participated and had a great time doing it.”

She encourages any individual, group, organisation or business wanting to run an event to get in touch or register it straight through the Seaweek website.

Seaweek is hosted by the NZ Association for Environmental Education. Its national sponsors in 2011 are the ASB Community Trust, Ministry of Fisheries, Department of Conservation, Greenpeace and the NZ Marine Studies Centre.

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