Introduction

New Zealanders, tourists and native wildlife are the big winners with the historic addition of the Te Kahui Kaupeka Conservation Park to Canterbury's public land.

Date:  21 April 2009 Source:  Office of the Minister of Conservation

New Zealanders, tourists and native wildlife are the big winners with the historic addition of the Te Kahui Kaupeka Conservation Park to Canterbury's public land.

Associate Minister of Conservation Kate Wilkinson will officially open the 93,800 hectare park in the Two Thumb Range in Mid-Canterbury tomorrow.

"Te Kahui Kaupeka is home to a huge variety of our wildlife, including keas, wetas and our native falcon. The landscape is truly spectacular and to have it officially open is a great gain for natural and historical heritage," Ms Wilkinson says.

"I have no doubt the park will become a top attraction for visitors to the region and the Department of Conservation can be proud of the work undertaken to secure this land for the whole country to enjoy."

Te Kahui Kaupeka brings together 11 tracts of public land, including a large segment of the renowned Mesopotamia Station, the historical home of English writer Samuel Butler.

It is the fifth conservation park established in the Canterbury high country and is host to a number of outdoor activities, including guided walks, horse-trekking, cross-country skiing and mountain biking.

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