Introduction

Join Team Takahē and help us return takahē to the wild - sponsor a Kahurangi takahē today!

Highlights

The Takahē Recovery Programme is attempting a pioneering operation of establishing a second wild population of takahē in the heart of the Kahurangi National Park. Your support will help us push ahead with our goal of establishing this population as quickly as possible.

The six selected sponsor birds represent two established breeding pairs and two sub-adults, that are part of the 30 founding birds released into the Kahurangi National Park in Autumn 2018.

I support takahē.

Sponsor packages

Sponsor* a takahē for yourself or as a gift for somebody special.

Bronze, Silver and Gold sponsor packages all include:

  • a letter of thanks
  • a takahē print
  • a Takahē Recovery canvas tote bag
  • "I support Takahē Recovery" stickers

Silver also includes a Takahē Recovery USB.

Gold also includes a Takahē Recovery USB and Takahē Recovery hat.


Select a takahē and the level of sponsorship you'd like to make.

Scoop – the Pioneer

Scoop the takahē.
Scoop

Male
Hatch date: 28 October 2016 

Scoop gets his name from the nickname of the young journalist who reported the story of Dr Orbell rediscovering the takahē in the Murchison Mountains in 1948. He filed the story late one day, unbeknown to him that it would make international news.

So Scoop the journalist was there at the beginning of the takahē recovery story and now Scoop the takahē is here at the beginning of establishing a new wild takahē population.

Ehara – the Surprise Chick

Ehara the takahē.
Ehara

Female
Hatch date: 9 November 2016

Ehara, meaning 'surprise' was aptly named as she was produced from her presumed infertile parents Paku and Quammen.

Making the news as a miracle chick she was an unexpected but welcomed addition to the takahē population.

Raised by her foster parents at the Te Anau Bird Sanctuary, we hope Ehara will go on to successfully contribute to building the Kahurangi takahē population.


* Sponsorship of individual takahē are not exclusive. Multiple people can sponsor the same bird. As takahē are a taonga (treasured) species to New Zealand Māori, the sponsorship is symbolic and does not entitle people any ownership of the birds.

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