Introduction

Side streams on these track systems may flood due to heavy or prolonged rain. Care is required. Plan properly for your trip and make sure your group has a capable leader.

The grassy river flats of the Caples and Greenstone Valleys are private farmland. Respect this, and stay on the tracks which follow the forest edge. Do not disturb stock.

The forest is a Stewardship Area managed by DOC. Fiordland National Park begins at the southern end of Lake McKellar.

Side stream flooding

Side streams on these track systems may flood due to heavy or prolonged rain - in particular the Caples River and side streams above Upper Caples Hut, and Jean Batten Creek south of McKellar Hut. Care is required.

Plan your trip

Plan properly for your trip and make sure your group has a capable leader. All trampers need to carry a sleeping bag, cooking utensils, sufficient food, basic first aid kit and adequate waterproof / warm clothing including gloves and hat.

Physical fitness and good equipment will make all the difference to your enjoyment of the trip.

Keep to the track

If you become lost, find shelter and stay calm.

Snow conditions

Although the tracks are not closed in winter, avalanche danger may be present below Slip Flat in the lower Greenstone, and snow may make travel very difficult, even on the valley floors. Check with the Queenstown Visitor Centre for information on snow conditions.

Weather

Always check the weather forecast before entering the area. McKellar Saddle is exposed, there is no shelter in adverse weather.

Before you go into the outdoors, tell someone your plans and leave a date to raise the alarm if you haven't returned. To do this, use the New Zealand Outdoors Intentions process on the AdventureSmart website. It is endorsed by New Zealand's search and rescue agencies and provides three simple options to tell someone you trust the details about your trip.

Water

Cattle is present on the grassy lower flats, so water taken from the streams should be boiled or sterilised. In huts and the higher regions of the tracks, water is generally safe to drink but trampers may wish to treat it for their own protection.

Waste

In areas without toilet facilities bury your toilet waste. Choose a place at least 50 m from tracks, huts, camping sites, popular areas and water sources. Dig a shallow hole 150 mm deep and bury all toilet waste and paper. This will stop the waste contaminating water sources.

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