Section of the Urban Living Wall
Image: DOC

Introduction

A new ‘Urban Living Wall’ launched in central Christchurch will showcase innovative technology that can be used to create green walls and city spaces.

The temporary wall, at the corner of Cashel and High streets, will use specially designed planter panels made from 3D-printed biodegradable plastic, felt and wood in which native plants will be grown.

The Department of Conservation is working with the Christchurch City Council and social enterprise company Fabriko (founders of the Fab Lab) to promote the living wall concept and the use of native plants in the city rebuild.

Department of Conservation ranger Annabelle Studholme says the designs for the planter panels are free online for anyone to use or develop further at www.urbanlivingwall.net and the project is a chance for people to get involved in creating a greener Christchurch.

“We’re calling for schools, businesses and the community to come and have a look and we’d love people to produce or pledge a panel for the wall.”

“The idea of conservation in the urban setting is exciting,” says Deputy Mayor Vicki Buck.

“Being involved with Fab Lab and school students to create another point of interest and difference is the sort of fun we want in our Central City.”

A number of schools including Breens Intermediate in Bishopdale, Linwood High and St Margaret’s College are using 3D technology to make panels for the wall, which will be completed and planted over the coming months.

Banks Peninsula native plants that are adapted to growing in exposed, rocky sites will be used in the wall. These plants also make a connection with public reserve areas around the city where they grow naturally.

The Urban Living Wall is a transitional project with a life of about three years.

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