Introduction

A series of short films presented by DOC rangers. They explore key concepts in our unique New Zealand environment and how all of us can enjoy and protect our nature.

Highlights

These notes are a guide to using the videos with your students or young people. For the activities and more ideas to support learning with these films, head over to Learning from home.

Don’t forget to share your nature activities with us

Exploring conservation

In this episode of Ranger Kōrero – the big picture, ranger Aroha explores the meaning of conservation in Aotearoa and what that means for us and our taonga species.

  • How could you learn more about taonga species in your local environment?
  • What is biosecurity? Research the DOC website to learn more.
  • Reflect on why nature is important to you – create some leaf art, write a story or poem to share your feelings about nature.
  • What can you do in your own backyard to protect and restore nature?
  • Build a wētā motel like the one featured at Discovery School.
  • Plant native plants like the ones they have at Discovery School.

Exploring biodiversity

In this episode of Ranger Kōrero – the big picture, ranger Dave explores the meaning of biodiversity in Aotearoa and how we all fit into that picture.

  • What is biodiversity? Do the Web of life activity to learn about the interdependence of living things
  • Create your own nature journals like the students from Discovery School.
  • Attract lizards to your garden like they have done at Discovery School.
  • Find out about animal connections and tree connections, to learn how plants and animals interact with each other in an ecosystem. Use these as guidance to create your own representation of links between plants and animals in your environment
  • Get to know a tree, and learn about their uniqueness by looking closely at leaves.
  • Experience and learn about birds and insects in your environment.
  • Take part in the annual Garden Bird Survey.
  • Learn about kereru and participate in the Great Kereru Count.

 

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