Historic Bealey Spur Hut

Management

Arthur’s Pass National Park, Department of Conservation.

Fabric

Bealey Spur Hut. Photo: Ian Hill.
Reconditioned Bealey Spur Hut

Bealey Spur Hut is a beech sapling-framed; corrugated iron-clad hut with a wooden floor. It has an open fire with a flat tin chimney and there are six spring mesh bunks attached to beach pole framing. These replaced the original uncomfortable diamond-mesh netting and chaff sack mattress bunks that the musterer’s had to endure. These were said to be "almost as hard as a fakir’s bed of nails". There is no window (although there is evidence that there was once one in the south wall) and daylight to the interior is provided by a sheet of corrugated Nova light in the roof. Tank water is available and a pit toilet is nearby. The hut was painted for the first time (by persons unknown) in 1997.

The hut is attractively sited in a clearing of beech forest.

History

The hut was built by Walter Taylor and Harry Faulkner, owners of Cora Lynn Station in 1935 and used as a base for Cora Lynn’s high country muster of the "Powers Country" which grazed up to 6000 sheep. It is also known as Top Hut and in the past has been know as Musterer’s, or Top Horse Hut. Remains of corrugated iron dog kennels and the horse/sheep holding paddock fence are in the vicinity of the hut. Use of the hut for mustering ceased when the land was retired in 1978 and added to Arthur’s Pass National Park.

Fabric significance

The hut is a good example of musterer’s huts of this era.  

Historic significance

The hut has local historic significance for its role in high country sheep farming.

Future management

The historic Bealey Spur Hut is a popular destination for day trips and overnight accommodation. It will be maintained to protect its historic fabric and minimise deterioration.

back to top

 

Find out more

Publications