Introduction

Moriori, Maori and European settlement in the Chatham Islands has left a variety of historic resources representing the cultural occupation of the lands by these people.

The Chatham Islands are regarded as being the last islands in the Pacific to be permanently settled by people.

Moriori, Maori and European settlement in the Chatham Islands has left a variety of historic resources representing the cultural occupation of the lands by these people. Examples of this occupation are common on land managed by the Department, and include the remaining two major concentrations of Moriori tree carvings in J.R. Barker (Hapupu) National Historic Reserve and Taia Bush Historic Reserve.

Glory Cottage, Pitt Island. Photo: Allan Jones.
Glory Cottage, Pitt Island

Other occupation sites include examples such as middens, quarries, burial and other wahi tapu sites which are common all around the island group. Over 700 archaeological sites are recorded on the Chatham Islands.

European historic sites relate to whaling, sealing, missionaries, agriculture and fishing.

Physical remnants include the:

  • Pitt Island Glory Cottage (c.1860) and
  • the woolshed and sheep dip site on Rangatira.
Back to top