Introduction

Eighty five endangered grand and Otago skinks have been collected near Wanaka in an operation led by the Department of Conservation (DOC) aimed at increasing their numbers.

Date:  11 April 2014

Eighty five endangered grand and Otago skinks have been collected near Wanaka in an operation led by the Department of Conservation (DOC) aimed at increasing their numbers.

Ongoing decline in western grand and Otago skink populations has prompted DOC and several other agencies to collect the skinks from their Grandview Range habitat in the Lindis. The skinks will be housed temporarily at zoos, wild life parks and ecosanctuaries throughout New Zealand, as part of a breed-for-release programme.

Otago skink.
Otago skink

This programme aims to increase numbers of both species so they can be released back into secure sites within their former range, Grand and Otago Skink Project Manager Gavin Udy said.

“This project is a great example of conservation agencies and individuals working together to ensure the ongoing survival of an iconic, unique and endangered New Zealand species,” Mr Udy said. Since the collection, 21 juvenile skinks have been born in captivity from this group.

DOC’s Grand and Otago Skink Project looks after two groups of the animals – an eastern group and a western group. The eastern group near Macraes Flat is increasing as it is protected by DOC’s predator-proof fenced enclosure and extensive trapping.

Now the focus is on increasing numbers of the western group.

Other groups, organisations and stakeholders involved in the conservation effort include:

  • Auckland Zoo – supports predator control at key localities, staff helped with collection trips, quarantine and health screening of skinks, husbandry and technical advice. The main holder of skinks in the breed-for-release programme.
  • Wellington Zoo – quarantined the skinks, provided health screening and involved in the breed-for-release programme.
  • Kiwi Birdlife Park, Queenstown – holding and processing skinks prior to distribution to Wellington and Auckland Zoos for quarantine and long-term holding, quarantining of skinks, health screening and involvement in the breed-for-release programme.
  • Isaac Conservation and Wildlife Trust – involved in the breed-for-release programme.
  • NZ Herpetological Society – involved in the breed-for-release programme.
  • Zoo Aquarium Association (ZAA) – co-ordinates the conservation breed-for-release programme.
  • Central Otago Ecological Trust (COET) – provides a secure release site within its Mokomoko predator-proof fenced sanctuary near Alexandra.
  • Orokonui Ecosanctuary –  provides a crèche enclosure within its predator-proof fence and provide education and advocacy for skink conservation.
  • University of Otago – subsidised genotyping for genetic matching of skinks.
  • Air New Zealand – transported the animals to safe new breeding sites around the country, through their partnership with DOC as provider of the Air New Zealand Threatened Species Translocation Programme.

DOC also thanks adjoining landowners and iwi for their support.

Skink rescue Feb 2014.
The team involved in the collection, back row from left, Amanda Salt, Warren Simpson, Riki Mules, Simon Madill (all DOC), front row, from left, Julie Underwood (Auckland Zoo), Marieke Lettink (herpetologist), Hannah Edmonds (DOC)

Contact

Gavin Udy
Grand and Otago Skink Project Manager
Department of Conservation, Alexandra
Phone +64 3 440 2065 or +64 27 220 7829
gudy@doc.govt.nz

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