Introduction

Conservation managers and wildlife vets from around the world will be descending on Melbourne in October to share expertise on wildlife breeding techniques.

Date:  31 July 2012

Conservation managers and wildlife vets from around the world will descend on Melbourne in October to share expertise on wildlife breeding techniques.

Hosted by Zoos Victoria and Melbourne Zoo, the Conservation Breeding Specialist Group workshops will discuss managing wildlife populations in their habitats and also developing intensive management programmes that can help to supplement wild populations.

Kate McInnes, Department of Conservation Wildlife Veterinarian, is encouraging wildlife managers to attend the conference.

Baby kiwi being held in human hands.
New Zealand has pioneered techniques for intensive management of threatened species such as kiwi

“Here in New Zealand, we are very good at landscape scale management of small wildlife and we have pioneered techniques for intensive management of threatened species such as kiwi and shore plover,” says Kate.

“We need to be aware of developments elsewhere in the world and also share our expertise with others and this conference is an ideal opportunity to do so.”

This conference is usually in the northern hemisphere and deals with the multitude of pressures of human influences on wildlife populations and their conservation.

“Our isolation in the southern hemisphere in the antipodes keeps some of these issues at bay, but we must embrace them and develop strategies for wildlife management that will help avoid some of the pitfalls that may have already occurred elsewhere in the world,” says Kate.

Kate hopes that others in New Zealand who have direct involvement wildlife conservation will attend.

“It would be great to have people from outside the zoo and research fraternity attending – we need to make sure that managers and practitioners are well represented, to help guide the work to ensure good practical conservation outcomes. It’s important to be able promote the economic benefits of wildlife and their habitats and this is a great chance to enhance understanding in that respect.”

Contact

Emily Wick, Conservation Breeding Specialist Group, email: office@cbsg.org

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