Introduction

Twelve volunteers and Department of Conservation (DOC) staff have completed planting 3500 native plants around the Fletcher Bay Campsite.

Twelve volunteers and Department of Conservation (DOC) staff have completed planting 3500 native plants around the Fletcher Bay campsite.

This four day project transformed the former sheep paddock campsite into a campsite landscaped with coastal eco-sourced plants. The retirement from grazing and plantings are part of ecological restoration work planned for the DOC Northern Coromandel campsites this year.

Without help from the enthusiastic volunteers these plantings would have been spaced out over several years. A full contingent of volunteers will be planting at Fantail Bay this week, followed by Port Jackson next month which has volunteer spaces available.

Volunteers from the Fletcher Bay Project commented on the great company, work ethic, co-operation and pleasure of working with others; having a free afternoon for fishing; the achievement of doing something worthwhile for conservation on the Coromandel Peninsula.

About volunteer projects

All the projects provide free transport from Thames and free accommodation on projects lasting two or more days. Time is provided in each programme to enjoy the natural surroundings which could include fishing, swimming, walking in beach, bush and farm park environs, bird-watching and enjoying awesome views into the Pacific Ocean and Hauraki Gulf.

“The volunteer projects offer opportunities to learn new skills, meet others with a shared interest in conservation, carry out useful conservation work and enjoy the outdoors,” says DOC Hauraki Area Manager, Melissa King-Howell. 

“The work is varied from maintenance work at our campgrounds, tracks and historic sites to dune planting, dotterel minding and helping prevent the spread of Kauri Dieback disease.”

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