Introduction

A mass of 3,000 pohutukawa trees were planted on Labour Weekend last month as part of the Project Crimson project with over 150 volunteers turning up to get involved in conservation.

Date:  09 November 2009

A mass of 3,000 pohutukawa trees were planted on Labour Weekend last month as part of the Project Crimson project with over 150 volunteers turning up to get involved in conservation. Department of Conservation Programme Manager Awhina White said today that funding from the Project Crimson Trust has contributed to another successful year of planting to restore pohutukawa to and along the East Cape. 

“We are grateful to Project Crimson who again supplied 3,000 pohutukawa trees which were planted at Matahi O Te Tau Marae and Rangiata, East Cape. The ongoing provision of pohutukawa trees and enthusiasm for new plantings have been recognised by the Trust with continued funding because they can see how successful the work has been in the past.” said Miss White. 

Awhina White (DOC) with Te Koha-kahurangi Henare planting a pohutukawa.
Awhina White (DOC) helping Te Koha-
kahurangi Henare plant a pohutukawa

On a Friday, with a brisk cold southerly and outbursts of rain 70 volunteers from Te Kura Kaupapa o Kawakawa Mai Tawhiti, Hinerupe Kohanga Reo and the community braved the weather to plant 1,500 pohutukawa trees at Matahi Marae. The day began with a karakia and welcome by the Chairman of the marae Leonard Walker and Reverend Kura Walker. 

This was followed by a sunny and hot Sunday, with excellent views out over the sea, a second planting of 1,500 pohutukawa trees took place at Rangiata, East Cape. Another 80 volunteers, including a community group Incedo who are connected to locals from Te Araroa were involved. The day started with a karakia and thanks from the landowners. Two local volunteers who took part in the planting, Dave White and Rarawa Kohere, had plenty to say in support of the work. 

“I was very pleased to have had the opportunity to work with DOC on Project Crimson and with the landowners, it was an excellent day, said Dave White.  Rarawa Kohere also said, “In times to come there will be a red crimson trail from Te Araroa to East Cape, thanks to you all.”

Project Crimson Trust’s aim is to help get these types of projects started and then to watch them flourish with local support. Projects must be able to demonstrate some public value and be focussed on the protection of pohutukawa and rata. People on the East Cape have, for a long time, supported Project Crimson’s mission. Up and down the coast, amazing pohutukawa revegetation projects are underway that over time will revert the coastline back to its former crimson glory.

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