In the “Supporting information on Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) marine mammal sanctuary proposal

1. About this document

The purpose of this document is to provide supporting information and analysis for the public consultation document ‘A proposal to establish a marine mammal sanctuary in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands)’.

Further information is also provided in appendices to this document, and in supporting research documents available at the following link: www.doc.govt.nz/boimms

2. Background on development of the marine mammal sanctuary proposal

The marine mammal sanctuary (MMS) proposed by the Minister of Conservation has been developed by the Department of Conservation Te Papa Atawhai working in partnership with Ngā Hapū o te Pēwhairangi1 to address the declining number of bottlenose dolphins.

2.1 New conditions were introduced to commercial marine mammal viewing permits in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) June 2019

In June 2019, new conditions were introduced to commercial marine mammal viewing permits in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands), addressing some of the bottlenose dolphin population decline issues. These conditions applied to commercial operators who hold a marine mammal viewing permit2 and included creating ‘no interaction with the dolphins’ zones (over a similar area to proposed marine mammal safe zones) and prohibiting commercial swimming with the dolphins in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands).

However, further action was needed to address the two other user groups interacting with dolphins – commercial maritime vessels that do not have a marine mammal viewing permit and private vessels – which led to investigations into various statutory and non-statutory approaches to addressing the problem.

2.2 Statutory and non-statutory approaches considered in addressing the decline in bottlenose dolphin numbers

Following the process to introduce new conditions to existing marine mammal viewing permits in 2019, the feasibility of various other management tools was investigated. It was concluded that a marine mammal sanctuary was the most appropriate tool to address declining bottlenose dolphin numbers in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands).

  • Hapū identified that the use of mātauranga Māori and tikanga protocols, ie rāhui, could support and enhance statutory measures. Rāhui is a traditional ‘management system’ for Te Taiao/the environment for the purpose of protecting taonga/treasures. In this instance, a rāhui could have been placed over Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) to additionally regulate human behaviour.
  • Non-statutory rāhui can be implemented quickly through social means but cannot be enforced by the Courts without the ability to prosecute.
  • A rāhui established under section 186A of the Fisheries Act 19963 could restrict fishing in a prescribed area; however, as with implementing the MMPR, enforcing a fishing breach of a rāhui would be difficult to prove intent and prosecute. It would also not prevent vessels entering and transiting the rahui area. Targeting fishing would also not address the key issue of vessel and human interactions with dolphins. Numerous customary fishing management tools already exist in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands), including rāhui (discussed in section 4.4). Future marine mammal management in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) will include an integrated management approach with Fisheries New Zealand and existing mana whenua customary management bodies.
  • The Marine Mammals Protection Act 19784 (MMPA) provides for Population Management Plans for threatened species or other species of marine mammal. As the focus of these plans is on allowable fishing limits and fishing-related mortality, a Population Management Plan would not be appropriate for Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) situation.
  • The Marine Reserves Act 19715 provides for the creation of marine reserves. These reserves create areas free from human-related alterations to marine habitats and life, providing a useful comparison for scientists to study. However, the focus is on ‘no take’ and, again, does not address activities such as swimming, snorkelling, boating and diving. As such, it is not an appropriate tool for Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands).
  • The proposed restrictions of the MMS described in this document and the consultation document would not target fishing or customary take; rather, vessel and human interactions with marine mammals.
  • The New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement6 (NZCPS) guides local authorities in their day-to-day management of the coastal environment. Policy 11 of the NZCPS requires councils to avoid adverse effects of activities on the significant habitat of indigenous taxa, which could include bottlenose dolphins. Enforcement under the NZCPS is challenging, as the way councils give regard to the NZCPS varies around the country. The Combined Northland Regional Plan is being developed and currently subject to Environment Court proceedings. Because of the stage of the process this plan is at, it is not considered an appropriate tool to address the immediate problem in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands). Future marine mammal management in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) will include collaboration with the Northland Regional Council to align both of these management tools to achieve marine mammal protection and broader integrated marine management.
  • A review of the current Marine Mammals Protection Regulations 19927 (MMPR) would be beneficial, but the long timescales involved in reform means a MMS is the most effective way to address the immediate need in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands). Furthermore, the causes of decline in bottlenose dolphins in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) are specific to the area and may not be adequately dealt with in any nationwide reform of the MMPR. Further details on the inadequacies of the MMPR are discussed below.

2.3 Inadequacies of the Marine Mammals Protection Regulations 1992 (MMPR)

The MMPR in their current form are unable to adequately address the area-specific issues in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) causing the decline in bottlenose dolphins.

2.3.1 Burden of proof

  • Where an operator has a permit or a concession, the Department of Conservation Te Papa Atawhai can rely on civil remedies in order to enforce compliance, such as
  • suspending or terminating the concession. Civil remedies have a lower burden of proof
    in a Court of law, so the Department of Conservation Te Papa Atawhai only has to prove
    on the balance of probabilities that the operator has breached the terms of their
    concession.
  • If an operator or a member of the public does not have a permit or a concession, then the Department of Conservation Te Papa Atawhai cannot rely on civil remedies and, instead, can only prosecute a breach of the legislation. The criminal burden of proof is higher, and the Department of Conservation Te Papa Atawhai has to prove beyond reasonable doubt that a breach of the legislation has occurred. Securing a conviction is difficult for this reason.

2.3.2 Cumulative impact

  • The nationally applicable MMPR do not address locally specific impacts on marine mammals and would be unlikely to be locally specific enough, even with review.
  • In Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands), bottlenose dolphins spend on average 86% of their day-light hours in the presence of at least one vessel and up to 400 vessels across the day. The level of vessel interactions with marine mammals in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) is significantly higher than in all other areas of New Zealand.
  • The MMPR in their current form address interactions as instantaneous singular events, ie number of vessels within 300 m at a single point in time or closest point of approach during an interaction. The MMPR do not regulate for the cumulative impacts of multiple interactions over time.

3. The legislative regime for establishing a MMS and for marine mammal protection

3.1 Department of Conservation Te Papa Atawhai and marine mammals under the Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978 (MMPA)

  • The Department of Conservation Te Papa Atawhai administers the MMPA which provides for the conservation, protection and management of marine mammals.
  • The MMPA enables the establishment of MMS within which activities known to harm marine mammal species can be prohibited, or restricted and strictly controlled by the Minister of Conservation.

3.2 Process for considering Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) MMS proposal under the MMPA

Marine Mammal Sanctuary proposals are considered under section 22 of the MMPA in
accordance with the following process:

  • A notice for the proposed MMS is placed in the NZ Gazette outlining the location of the proposed sanctuary, the proposed restrictions, and providing members of the public with 28 days to make a submission on the sanctuary proposal. This was done on 20 April 2021. A copy of the Gazette notice can be found in Appendix 1.
  • Anyone is then able to make a submission on the MMS proposal within a 28 day period, either by the website (www.doc.govt.nz/boimms), email, post or in person at the Kerikeri Department of Conservation Office. The 28-day consultation period finishes at 5 pm on 18 May 2021. Further details on how to make a submission are included in the consultation document.
  • The Minister of Conservation will then consider submissions on the MMS proposal and either decide to declare the sanctuary as defined in the first Gazette notice, or decide to vary, redefine or abolish the sanctuary proposal.
  • Before making a decision to declare, vary, redefine or abolish the proposed MMS, the Minister of Conservation will seek the consent of all other Ministers who control any Crown-owned land, foreshore, seabed or waters of the sea in the area which is declared to be a MMS.
  • The proposed MMS, including its proposed restrictions, would become operational if a final notice is then placed in the Gazette declaring the sanctuary, and its restrictions.

4. The Treaty of Waitangi and the special relationship between the Crown and Māori

4.1 Crown obligations and decision making

The Crown has obligations to Māori through the Treaty of Waitangi and legislation. The Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978 is subject to the obligation under section 4 of the Conservation Act 19878 to give effect to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. This includes any decision under section 22 of the Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978 in relation to the marine mammal sanctuary proposal.

The Treaty principles that are most relevant to marine mammal protection and management are:

4.1.1 Partnership – mutual good faith and reasonableness

The Crown and Māori must act towards each other reasonably and in good faith. These mutual duties are the core of what has been described as the Treaty partnership.

4.1.2 Informed decision-making

Both the Crown and Māori need to be well informed of each other’s interests and views. When exercising the right to govern, Crown decision-makers need to be fully informed, while for Māori, full information needs to be provided in order to contribute to the decision-making process. This is connected closely to the principles of good faith and active protection.

4.1.3 Active protection

The Crown must actively protect Māori interests retained under the Treaty as part of the promises made in the Treaty for the right to govern. This includes the promise to protect tino rangatiratanga and taonga. Active protection requires informed decision-making and judgement as to what is reasonable in the circumstances.

4.1.4 Redress and reconciliation

The Treaty relationship should include processes to address differences of view between the Crown and Māori. The Crown must preserve the capacity to provide redress for proven grievances from not upholding the promises made in the Treaty. Māori and the Crown should demonstrate reconciliation as grievances are addressed.

4.2 Te Takutai Moana Act 2011 and the MMS process

Te Takutai Moana Act 20119 (TM Act), in relation to the common marine and coastal area, protects the interests of New Zealanders, recognises the mana tuko iho exercised by whānau, hapū and iwi and as tangata whenua, and provides for the legal expression of customary interests. The requirements of the TM Act directly impact the MMS statutory process. Under the TM Act, whānau, hapū and iwi who exercise kaitiakitanga in a part of the common marine and coastal area where a ‘conservation process’ is being considered (such as a MMS proposal) have a right to participate in the process and provide their views.

The Director-General of Conservation is required to give notice of any proposed conservation process to any affected whānau, hapū and iwi. This notice can be part of the public notice given of the proposal, eg in the Gazette notice. Sufficient information must be provided in the notice so that whānau, hapū or iwi can fully exercise their participation rights.

The Minister of Conservation is then required to have particular regard to the views of those affected whānau, hapū or iwi in making a decision on the MMS proposal10.

4.3 Customary marine title and protected customary rights applications and the MMS proposal

The TM Act provides a process for recognition of whānau, hapū or iwi customary marine title and protected customary rights. Numerous applications seeking recognition of customary marine title have been made in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands), to be progressed through direct engagement with the Crown or through the High Court. A full list of all TM Act applications in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) can be found in Appendix 2. There are currently no scheduled High Court proceedings and no applicants have progressed to formal engagement with the

Minister for recognition of TM Act rights in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands). If a MMS were to be established in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands), the area of the sanctuary would remain part of the common marine and coastal area and, therefore, any applications for recognition of customary marine title and/or protected customary rights would still be able to proceed. There have been no determinations of TM Act rights in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) to date.

4.4 The MMS and Māori customary fishing rights and interests

Customary fishing rights are protected in law by the Treaty of Waitangi (Fisheries Claims) Settlement Act 199211 and 1992 Deed of Settlement and include customary fishery management
and the exercise of other customary rights.

The following customary fisheries exist in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) (Fig. 1):

  • Ngati Kuta / Patukeha Rohe Moana and Nga Hapu o Taiamai Ki Te-Marangi Rohe
    Moana.
  • Te Puna Mātaitai Reserve.
  • Waikare Inlet Taiāpure.
  • Maunganui Bay Rahui.

A MMS does not prevent the operation of existing or proposed rohe moana, mātaitai, rāhui and taiāpure under the Fisheries Act 1996 and arising out of the Treaty of Waitangi (Fisheries Claims) Settlement Act 1992.

A MMS under the MMPA brings additional management tools to the table that are not available under the Fisheries Act 1996 and its regulations, including the Fisheries (Kaimoana Customary Fishing) Regulations 1998.

Figure 1. Te Pēwhairangi MMS proposal and existing customary fishing tools.

View Figure 1 (JPG, 389K)

4.5 Treaty settlement and the MMS proposal

The Department of Conservation Te Papa Atawhai has commitments in Treaty settlements, particularly through protocols and relationship agreements, which require engagement early on the matter for consultation; ensuring sufficient information and time is provided to enable effective participation; engaging with an open mind; and reporting back on the outcome. Many iwi, including Ngāpuhi (which Ngā Hapū o te Pēwhairangi are a part of) are still involved in Treaty settlement negotiations with the Crown.

5. Assessment of the proposed MMS

The MMS proposal includes restrictions aimed at reducing the amount of vessel and human interactions with marine mammals in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands), as the research indicates that this is what has led to the change in survival-critical dolphin behaviour.

This includes:

  • a restriction on being in the water with marine mammals in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) within the wider MMS area;
  • maintaining a vessel distance of 400 m from marine mammals in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) within the wider MMS area; and
  • the creation of two smaller marine mammal safe zones within the MMS where speed for all vessels will be restricted to 5 knots.

It is also proposed that a review of the MMS, including the impact and effectiveness of
restrictions and prohibitions, be performed 3 years after any MMS is declared.

Activities that are likely to be affected by a MMS
Activity Details
Swimming with marine mammals

Swimming with any marine mammals would be prohibited in the MMS.

This builds on restrictions that already exist for everyone under the MMPR, such as:

  • no swimming with whales or orca, and
  • no swimming with pods of dolphins containing juveniles.

Under the MMPR, commercial operators are already prohibited from allowing swimming with marine mammals unless they hold a marine mammal viewing permit that permits swimming with marine mammals. All marine mammal viewing permits in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) were amended in 2019 to prohibit swimming with bottlenose dolphins and whales.

Therefore, no commercial operators are currently allowed to swim with bottlenose dolphins and whales in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands).

Marine commercial operators’ movements and interactions with marine mammals

As noted, existing commercial operators with a marine mammal viewing permit already have a condition of no swimming with bottlenose dolphins and whales, and also a prohibition on interacting with marine mammals in areas similar to the proposed marine mammal safe zones. They will now have a requirement to maintain a speed of no more than 5 knots when transiting through the marine mammal safe zones.

Other commercial operators who do not have a marine mammal viewing permit are already required to refrain from marine mammal viewing or swimming within 300 m, as defined under the MMPR. Under the MMS these existing restrictions will be amended within the sanctuary area with a requirement to refrain from allowing patrons to swim within 400 m of marine mammals and for vessels to maintain a 400 m
distance from marine mammals. Additionally, a new requirement to keep to the 5 knot speed limit in the marine mammal safe zones will be required.

All areas of Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) will remain open
and accessible to all operators.

Private and recreational vessel movements and interactions with marine mammals

Private and recreational vessels will be required to refrain from swimming within 400 m of marine mammals within the MMS area; maintain a 400 m distance from marine mammals and keep to the 5 knot speed limit in the marine mammal safe zones.

This simplifies and builds on restrictions that already exist for everyone under the MMPR, such as:

  • having no more than 3 vessels within 300 m of whales and dolphins;
  • staying 50 m away from any whale or orca;
  • staying 200 m away from any baleen / sperm whale with a calf; and
  • not travelling faster than idle or ‘no wake’ speed within 300 m of whales or dolphins.

References

  1. Hapū of the Bay of Islands
  2. Any commercial operator who undertakes commercial operations where a purpose is to view or come into contact with any marine mammal in New Zealand or in New Zealand fisheries waters is required to have a marine mammal viewing permit issued under the Marine Mammal Protection Regulations 1992
  3. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1996/0088/latest/DLM397974.html
  4. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1978/0080/latest/DLM25111.html
  5. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1971/0015/latest/DLM397838.html
  6. https://www.doc.govt.nz/about-us/science-publications/conservation-publications/marine-and-coastal/newzealand-coastal-policy-statement/new-zealand-coastal-policy-statement-2010/
  7. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/regulation/public/1992/0322/latest/DLM168286.html
  8. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1987/0065/latest/DLM103610.html
  9. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2011/0003/latest/DLM3213131.html
  10. s47 and 48 te Takutai Moana Act 2011 (In the event of a dispute as to whether or which iwi, hapū or whānau are affected, the Director General of Conservation must make the final decision.)
  11. http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1992/0121/latest/DLM281433.html

Appendix 1

Notice of intention to declare a marine mammal sanctuary (MMS) in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands)

Notice of Intention to Declare Marine Mammal Sanctuary

  1. I give notice that I intend (with the consent of the Minister of Energy and Resources, the
    Minister for Oceans and Fisheries, and the Minister of Transport) to declare, pursuant to
    section 22 of the Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978, a marine mammal sanctuary to be called Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) Marine Mammal Sanctuary, comprising all the areas of the sea enclosed by a straight line running from 174° 8.210' E, 35° 9.383' S to 174°
    19.809' E, 35° 10.174' S (“the outer boundary”) and then running along the shoreline within
    that outer boundary on the line of mean high water springs.
  2. It is proposed to have two Marine Mammal Safe Zones with the following outward facing
    boundaries in the sea area:
    1. The first zone being between Motuarohia Island (Roberton Island) and Moturua Island, enclosed to the North by a straight line running from 174° 9.608' E , 35° 13.661' S to 174° 10.736' E, 35° 13.382' S and enclosed to the South by a straight line running from 174° 10.672' E, 35° 14.177' S to 174° 11.617' E, 35° 13.960' S;
    2. The second zone being sea area between Tapeka Point and Whangaiwahine Point enclosed to the South by a straight line running from 174° 7.390' E, 35° 14.498' S and 174° 11.237' E, 35° 14.904' S.
  3. A map of the proposed sanctuary is available at www.doc.govt.nz/boimms or on request
    from a Department of Conservation office.
  4. The map is indicative only, and if there is a conflict between it and the written descriptions in this notice of the areas to which it relates, the written descriptions prevail.
  5. The following restrictions would apply to the proposed sanctuary, subject to the proposed exemptions in paragraphs 6 and 7 of this Notice:
    1. The marine mammal sanctuary would be established with “marine mammal safe zones” within its boundary.
    2. In a marine mammal safe zone the operator of a vessel would need to ensure that the vessel travels at no more than 5 knots at all times.
    3. Throughout the proposed sanctuary no person would be allowed to be in the water within 400 metres of a marine mammal.
    4. Throughout the proposed sanctuary every vessel operator would need to:
      1. ensure that the vessel it operates keeps 400 metres from any marine mammal.
      2. to use all reasonable means to stop if a marine mammal moves within 400 metres of the vessel operator’s vessel, to allow the marine mammal to move 400 metres away.
  6. The following vessels would be exempted from all restrictions in the proposed sanctuary:
    1. any vessel involved in a maritime emergency or undertaking a maritime emergency
      role, 
    2. any vessel undertaking research under the Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978,
    3. any vessel undertaking a compliance role (including the Department of Conservation under the Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978, Maritime Police, Customs, Ministry for Primary Industries, Northland Regional Council),
    4. any Harbourmaster vessel,
    5. any Navy vessel.
  7. Any vessel with an existing marine mammal viewing permit under the Marine Mammals
    Protection Act 1978 as at 20 April 2021 would be exempt from proposed restriction 5(4)(a).
  8. The following definition of “vessel” is proposed for the sanctuary conditions. “Vessel” means every description of boat or craft used in navigation, whether or not it has any means of propulsion; and includes:
    1. a barge, lighter, or other like vessel;
    2. a hovercraft or other thing deriving full or partial support in the atmosphere from the
      reaction of air against the surface of the water over which it operates;
    3. a submarine or other submersible;
    4. a seaplane while it is on the surface of the water.
  9. I shall consider any written submission on my intention to create this sanctuary or on any of the restrictions I intend to impose if:
    1. it is addressed to:
      1. “Proposed Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands) marine mammal sanctuary
        Department of Conservation
        34 Landing Road
        Kerikeri 0230”; or
      2. www.doc.govt.nz/boimms; or
      3. boimms@doc.govt.nz; and
    2. I receive it within 28 days after the publication of this notice in the New Zealand Gazette, being 18 May 2021.
  10. Under te Takutai Moana Act 2011, any whānau, hapū or iwi, who consider they exercise kaitiakitanga in a part of the common marine and coastal area affected by my intention to declare the marine mammal sanctuary as set out in this notice may advise the Director- General accordingly, and provide their views on my intent in writing as above within 28 days after the publication of this notice in the New Zealand Gazette. I will have particular regard to those views.

Dated at Wellington this 20th day of April 2021.

HON Dr AYESHA VERRALL, Acting Minister of Conservation

Appendix 2

List of customary title applications under te Takutai Moana Act 2011 in Te Pēwhairangi (Bay of Islands)
Application Number Applicant Group
MAC-01-01-001 Awhirangi Panehina Lawrence Whanau, Mita Pomana Whanau, Takutai Moana whanau Trust
MAC-01-01-002 Craven Whanau
MAC-01-01-004 Garry Walmsley
MAC-01-01-010 Haare-Himiana-Heta Whanau Hapu
MAC-01-01-014 The Hapu Patutoka, Tahawau, Whanau Pani Te Hokokeha Tawhiu (Waiparerea Marae)
MAC-01-01-021 Hikuwai - Ihaia Whanau
MAC-01-01-023 Ihaia Paora Weka Tuwhera Gavala Murray Mahinepua Reserve Trust Ngatirua Iti Ngati Muri Ngati ruamahue Ngati Kawau Ngati Haiti Ngaitupango Ngapuhi Ngati Kahu Te Aupouri
MAC-01-01-033 Maungahoutoa Trust
MAC-01-01-034 Merehora Taurua Whanau
MAC-01-01-035 Mita Pomana and Takutai Moana Heke Pomana Whanau
MAC-01-01-040 Ngā Hapū o Tangaroa ki Te Ihu o Manaia tai atu ki Mangawhai
MAC-01-01-044 Nga Uri o Hairama Pita Kino Reweti
MAC-01-01-050 Ngapuhi Nui Tonu (Awataha Marae)
MAC-01-01-056 Ngapuhi Nui Tonu (Te Kotahitanga Marae)
MAC-01-01-057 Ngapuhi Nui Tonu (Te Tii Marae)
MAC-01-01-059 Ngapuhi Nui Tonu-Kota-toka-tutaha-moana o whaingaroa
MAC-01-01-060 Ngapuhi, Ngati Wai, Haki Pereki and Ngawhetu Sadler Whanau Trust
MAC-01-01-064 Ngati Hine
MAC-01-01-073 Ngati Kawau and Te Waiariki Korora
MAC-01-01-076 Ngāti Kuta and Patukeha ki Te Rawhiti
MAC-01-01-078 Ngati Manu and its hapu, Te Uri Karaka and Te Uri o Raewera
MAC-01-01-081 Ngāti Rahiri and Ngāti Kawa
MAC-01-01-082 Ngāti Rēhia Hapū
MAC-01-01-087 Ngāti Torehina ki Matakā Hapu/Iwi of Niu Tireni
MAC-01-01-097 O Nga Hapu o Taimai ki te Marangai
MAC-01-01-103 Pene Hemi Kiwikiwi Whanau Trust
MAC-01-01-105 Reti whanau
MAC-01-01-106 Rewha and Reweti Whanau
MAC-01-01-125 Te Hikutu whanau and hapu
MAC-01-01-131 Iwi, whānau and hapū of Ngātiwai
MAC-01-01-132 Te Kapotai
MAC-01-01-133 Te Kaunihera o Te Tai Tokerau
MAC-01-01-134 Te Kemara I Whanau, Ngati Kawa and Ngati Rahiri
MAC-01-01-149 Te Whanau a Rangiwhakaahu
MAC-01-01-151 Te Whanau Hau o Te Whiu Hapu
MAC-01-01-163 Whanau Moran
CIV-2017-404-523 O Nga Hapu o Taiamai ki te Marangai
CIV-2017-404-525 Ngati Manu and Ngati Rangi
CIV-2017-404-535 Ngati Rahiri hapu
CIV-2017-404-537 Nga Puhi nui toni, Ngati Rahiri, Ngati Awa, Nga Tahuhu and Ngaitawake
CIV-2017-404-558 Ngaitawake
CIV-2017-404-570 Te Hikitu Hapū
CIV-2017-404-572 Ngati Torehina Ki Matakā, Hapu of Niu Tireni
CIV-2017-404-577 Ngāti Rahiri and Ngāti Kawa
CIV-2017-485-231 Ngati Hine
CIV-2017-485-256 McGee whanau
CIV-2017-485-265 Nga uri o Tareha Kaiteke Te Kemara I, Ngati Kawa and Ngati Rahiri
CIV-2017-485-277 Ngāti Manu and its hapū Te Uri Karaka and Te Uri o Raewera
CIV-2017-485-283 Ngātiwai whānau, hapū and iwi
CIV-2017-485-298 Whakarara Maori Committee
CIV-2017-485-321 Ngāti Kuta and Te Patukeha ki Te Rawhiti
CIV-2017-485-349 Te Kapotai
CIV-2017-485-352 Rewha and Reweti Whanau
CIV-2017-485-398 Ngati Kawau and Te Waiariki Korora
CIV-2017-485-408 Nga Uri o Hairama Pita Kino Davies
CIV-2017-485-510 Hapu of Ngāti Mokokohi, Te Tahawai, Te Uri-o-Te-Aho, Ngāti Ruamahue, Te Uri o Hua, Ngāti Rehia and Ngāti Torehina
CIV-2017-485-515 Reti Whanau
CIV-2017-488-026 Te Kapotai
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