In the “Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2015

Impact we seek

Our history is brought to life and protected

Impact indicators

The condition of actively conserved historic places Performance improving.

The trend in New Zealanders' awareness of DOC as a manager of historic places Performance maintained.

The trend in visitor numbers at Historic Icon sites Performance maintained.

The trend in visitor satisfaction with the quality of the opportunities provided at historic places Performance maintained.

10-year stretch goals

The stories of 50 historic Icon Sites are told and protected.

DOC manages the single largest portfolio of heritage in New Zealand. Our aim is to bring New Zealand's history to life, and in doing so, protect the heritage places that are expressions of this history.

To achieve this, we:

  • Focus on providing top-quality visitor experiences at 20 Historic Icon destinations by telling engaging and memorable stories about New Zealand's identity.
  • Ensure a representative sample of heritage is conserved at 595 actively conserved historic places and the experience for visitors is improved.
  • Safeguard more than 13,000 protected historic places from avoidable harm. Records of these places and where they are located13 are available for when work at these locations is being planned.

We want people to connect to New Zealand's past and to feel enriched by the experiences provided.

The condition of actively conserved historic places

From 2010/11 to 2012/13 the number of sites categorised as deteriorating increased. We began to turn this trend around in 2012/13, and have made significant gains in the number of sites categorised as stable in 2014/15. The proportion of sites categorised as stable rose from 49 percent in 2013/14 to 73 percent in 2014/15. This gain is largely the result of improvements to DOC's historic heritage maintenance regime, resulting in fabric conservation tasks being carried out more frequently and consistently.

Table 2: Number of key heritage sites categorised as stable or deteriorating.
 

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Stable

290

310

269

293

432

Deteriorating

211

287

338

311

163

The Manganuku truss bridge: saving a rare survivor

New Zealand's mountainous terrain and many rivers were a challenge to settlers and made travel very dangerous. Bridges opened up access across the country and continue to connect New Zealanders with each other. Of the many thousands of bridges built, the Manganuku truss bridge, adjacent to State Highway 2 near Opotiki, is the last wooden Howe truss design bridge remaining. Since 1960 it has been preserved as a national bridge heritage site. After withstanding the elements for the past 80 years, emergency restoration work was needed and its decaying timbers have now been replaced.

The trend in New Zealanders' awareness of DOC as a manager of historic places

Table 3: Change over time in New Zealanders' awareness of the Department of Conservation as an administrator of historic heritage sites.14
 

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Percentage of New Zealanders

63

61

67

68

Public awareness of DOC's role in managing more than 13,000 heritage sites reflects our level of success in promoting New Zealand's heritage, and should have an influence on others helping protect and manage their heritage. The level of awareness has been maintained for 2 years. Awareness is significantly higher for New Zealanders aged over the age of 34, and higher across the South Island than in the North Island.

The trend in visitor numbers at Historic Icon sites

Engaging New Zealanders with their heritage includes encouraging them to visit heritage sites.

The proportion of New Zealanders visiting heritage places on public conservation lands is an indicator of how successful we are at engaging people with their heritage.

There continues to be a strong increase in participation.

Table 4: Change over time in New Zealanders' participation in historic heritage on public conservation lands and waters.15
 

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Percentage of New Zealanders

29

47

48

55

Selected on their potential to bring history to life, Historic Icon sites are great places to tell stories about the Kiwi identity, to grow tourism, and help to generate economic benefits.

Understanding visitor numbers is one way of reflecting on the benefit of heritage sites. Visitation is monitored to determine trends in use, and use levels reflect the effectiveness of promotion and the appeal of the site itself.

Since reporting on Historic Icon sites began in 2011/12, more sites have seen growth in visitation than are stable or declining.

Bringing history to life is the key to providing a memorable and satisfying experience for visitors. Our logic model is that visitor satisfaction with an experience leads to an understanding of the value of heritage and to support for protecting it.16

Rangihoua Heritage Park: Successful bicentennial partnership

On 21 December 2015, more than 750 people were inspired to come from overseas and throughout New Zealand to mark the bicentenary of New Zealand's first Christmas service, delivered in 1814. They travelled to Hohi in the Bay of Islands where Reverend Samuel Marsden established the first European settlement, a Church of England mission station. Now known as Rangihoua Heritage Park, the 46-hectare coastal site has been transformed by 9 years of hard work and collaboration between the Marsden Cross Trust Board, the Anglican Church, Ngāti Torehina/Ngāpuhi, and DOC.

Table 5: Results for specific Historic Icon sites.
 

2014/15 total counts

Change since 2013/14 (%)

Average annual change (%)

Number of years counted

Likely reason for change

Bridge to Nowhere

16,528

-9

+4

6

Recent flooding limited access

Timber Trail

6,273

+15

+138

4

Full trail now established

Government Buildings

18,838

+110

+44

3

Extended operating season for the guided tours

Ship Cove

25,392

-23

-7

8

One of the three water taxi operators ceased operations, limiting the transport options for visitors.

Denniston Mine

15,489

-31

+17

5

Concession operation closed part of this year

Godley Head

9,289

+21

+63

3

Reopening access after post-earthquake risk part closure

Table 6: Change over time in New Zealanders' satisfaction with the quality of historic heritage opportunities provided.17
 

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Percentage of New Zealanders satisfied with the quality of heritage opportunities provided

87

75

74

78

Outputs that contribute to this intermediate outcome

The output classes and output groups that contribute to this intermediate outcome are set out in Appendix 2. These are reported on in the statement of service performance below.

Statement of service performance 2014/15: Management of historic heritage

Performance measures and targets: 2014/15

National commentary18

Management of historic heritage

 

21 historical or cultural heritage assets for which remedial work is completed to standard.

Remedial work was undertaken to standard on 17 historic or cultural heritage assets. 
Not achieved
Northern Region reported re-scheduling work on Motuihe Tower to 2015/16 based on the resources required to bring the project to completion.
Central North Island Region reported that work at 3 sites did not proceed when more detailed planning took place. This affected assets at Hine Rae Pā, Waiotahi Pā, and Taupiri Lookout.

1,110 historical or cultural heritage assets for which regular maintenance work is on track to standard.

Maintenance work is on track to standard for 1,387 historical and cultural heritage assets. 
Achieved

26 historical or cultural heritage assessment reports completed to standard.

39 historical or cultural assessment reports were completed to standard. 
Achieved

Output class operating statement 2014/15: Management of historic heritage
 

Actual
30/06/14
$000

Budget
30/06/15
$000

Revised budget
30/06/15
$000

Actual
30/06/15
$000

Revenue

Crown

5,151

5,582

6,322

6,322

Other

15

414

2,434

1,408

Total revenue

5,166

5,996

8,756

7,730

Expenses

Total expenses

4,763

5,996

6,806

6,635

Surplus/(deficit)

403

1,950

1,095


13 See www.archsite.org.nz.

14 Ipsos 2015a.

15 ibid.

16 Support for this approach comes from: Ham, S. 2007: Can interpretation really make a difference? Answers to four questions from cognitive and behavioural psychology. Proceedings of the Interpreting World Heritage Conference. Vancouver; Petty, R.; Cacioppo. J. 1986: Communication and persuasion: Central and peripheral routes to attitude change. Springer: New York; Moscardo, G. 1999: Making visitors mindful – Principles for creating sustainable visitor experiences through effective communication. Sagamore: Champaign; Beck, L.; Cable, T. 2002: Interpretation for the 21st century: Fifteen guiding principles for interpreting nature and culture. Sagamore: Champaign; Preucel, R.W.; Mrozowski, S.A. (Eds) 2010: Contemporary archaeology in theory: The new pragmatism. Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford.

17 Ipsos 2015a.

18 DOC considers that performance has been achieved when the output is within a tolerance level acceptable for the nature of the operation. For field operations, this is generally within +/-10% of the projected performance target. For significant outputs however, as shown on the 'Summary of Output Performance' table, this tolerance is +/-5%. When outside these ranges, a variance comment is provided.

Back to top