In the “Annual Report for year ended 30 June 2007

People enjoy and benefit from New Zealand’s natural and historic heritage and are connected with conservation.

This outcome draws together the work being done to fulfil several of the Department’s key functions under the Conservation Act 1987. These functions promote the benefits of conservation and build a shared sense of stewardship with the community and commercial organisations by providing information, education, recreation and leisure experiences, and opportunities to participate in protecting and restoring the country’s natural and historic heritage.

This section of the 2006–2007 Annual Report demonstrates how the Department’s work is achieving the high level outcome ‘Appreciation: People enjoy and benefit from New Zealand’s natural and historic heritage and are connected with conservation’. It provides information and case studies to track progress on the three intermediate outcomes identified in its Statement of Intent 2006–2009:

  1. People are aware of, understand and make valued contributions to conservation.
  2. People have access to and use a range of quality recreation opportunities on public conservation land.
  3. Appropriate business (concession) opportunities are allowed and operate in
    conservation areas.

Figure 17: How appreciation work contributes to the Department’s vision.
Figure 17: How appreciation work
contributes to the Department’s vision.
View a larger version of
Figure 17 (PDF, 49K)

It also records progress toward the three key Appreciation initiatives identified in the Statement of Intent for the 2006–2007 year.

New Zealanders want their natural and historic heritage conserved. And, increasingly, they want to be involved.

During 2006–2007, core elements of the Department’s work toward this outcome focused on the following areas, and clearly support the Government’s three priorities:

  • National identity – by promoting people’s understanding, awareness and enjoyment of their heritage – including promoting the multi-faceted benefits that conservation provides for New Zealand’s sustainable social and economic future.
  • Economic transformation – by providing access to a range of quality recreation opportunities, including those provided by private enterprise. Allowing commercial organisations to operate in conservation areas not only expands the opportunities and choices people have to use and enjoy public conservation land, but also reinforces conservation’s economic and social value.
  • Families, young and old – by providing opportunities for people to become active in conservation, both on public and private land.

Karamea year 8 students, Shaelen Taha (left) and Alexandra Robinson, measure the diameter of a Powelliphanta annectens snail.
Karamea year 8 students, Shaelen Taha
(left) and Alexandra Robinson, measure
the diameter of a Powelliphanta annectens
snail. Local students have been involved
in monitoring native species in the Heaphy
area for the past four years 

The Department maintained its drive to improve the quality of New Zealand’s network of outdoor recreation facilities and the opportunities they offer to a wide range of people. The high level of satisfaction with people’s recreation experience, reported in 2005–2006, was sustained.

A recreation summit (September 2006) saw the Department working with other agencies and groups to scope the challenges, opportunities and trends for outdoor recreation. One outcome was a partnership between the Department and Sport and Recreation New Zealand (SPARC) to review existing outdoor recreation opportunities, to see whether they are able to respond to and absorb future changes and trends.

In its work with communities, the Department continued to improve how it engages on a broad range of innovative and creative projects, and worked alongside communities to grow their conservation skills. 

The Department’s work with its concession partners added value to the services these businesses provide to their customers – including helping concessionaires improve the content and delivery of conservation information they provide to visitors.

The Department’s progress toward the two high-level outcome indicators for its appreciation work is reported below as part of this overview. Progress toward the three intermediate appreciation outcomes and their indicators is presented in the remainder of the Appreciation section, and summarised in Appendix A.

Improving capability

In 2006–2007 the Department committed to replacing its asset management system. This was necessary to build in more robust financial treatment of assets, particularly for the large number of visitor assets it manages (including structures, huts and tracks). Achieving this outcome will mean the Department is better placed to monitor, control, report on and plan its asset management. It is a substantial piece of work. Implementation in mid-2008 will include enhanced skills training for staff.

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