In the “Paparoa National Park Management Plan

Ngā tamariki a tāne

'Ngā Tamariki a Tāne' means the children of Tāne. Tāne, a son of Ranginui and brother of Aoraki, is the deity of the forests. Tāne produced many descendants including a variety of trees and animals, and also people. This section of the Plan is about the relationship between these children of Tāne – both the flora and fauna of Paparoa National Park, and humankind.

Map 6: Place overview

Map 6: Place overview
Note: High resolution maps are available at www.doc.govt.nz/paparoa.

This section covers the 'Places' of Paparoa National Park, as shown on Map 6 – enabling integrated conservation management and providing specific management direction. The values, issues and outcomes sought for each Place are identified, and the policies set out the actions required during the life of this Plan to achieve those outcomes.

Each Place is represented within this Plan by a Ngāi Tahu taonga tree species that can be found within Paparoa National Park. While each tree species may be found across many parts of the Park, the characteristics and values of each species link closely to the characteristics and values of each Place. The Places of Paparoa National Park are:

  • 4. Nīkau Place
  • 5. Tī Kōuka Place
  • 6. Mānuka Place
  • 7. Horoeka Place

4. Nīkau Place

The nīkau palm is abundant within Paparoa National Park and is an unofficial symbol for Punakaiki. It is a plant that both traditionally and in contemporary times has been utilised extensively by people. Similarly, this Place (see Map 7) is most heavily associated with and shaped by human interaction. The nīkau palm is also known for its iconic aesthetic in the same way that the natural features of this area, such as the Pancake Rocks, are iconic to the area.

4.1 Description
Te āhua

Nīkau Place is the most visited area of Paparoa National Park and is widely used and enjoyed for its scenic beauty and recreation opportunities. It includes much of the coastal section of the Park and the Inland Pack Track. Along with the Bullock Creek Farm Conservation Area (immediately adjacent to the Park), these areas and tracks provide an access way for the recreation activities occurring in this Place. Many visitors perceive the coastal area to be part of Paparoa National Park, but the land is mostly outside Park boundaries and either freehold or managed by others, including local authorities. As such this is one of the more complex Places within Paparoa National Park.

Map 7a: Nīkau Place

Map 7a: Nikau Place
Note: High resolution maps are available at www.doc.govt.nz/paparoa.

The original human interactions with this area stemmed from its mahinga kai values. Nīkau Place was traversed by Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae to gather māhinga kai for food, resources, and medicinal purposes. Many of these mahinga kai species, including Nīkau, are still thriving within the Place today. Plants such as gigi/kiekie and wharariki/mountain flax are used for weaving and making various items for survival. Harakeke/flax is utilised for its fibre for textiles in rope and sail making, while toetoe is used in weaving baskets, mats, wall linings, roof thatching and to make containers to cook food.

Today, many of the interactions with this area are based on tourism and the viewing of its unique landscape. This Place is known for its important geological features including the icon destination of the Pancake Rocks at Dolomite Point and the Barrytown syncline. Dolomite Point provides a truly world class visitor experience with its dramatic coastline and blow holes. The township of Punakaiki derives its name from the widely known blow holes (puna), which are located near the equally famous Pancake Rocks (kāike – lying heaped one above the other).

The syncline lies parallel with the rest of the main Paparoa Range and extends from Hibernia Creek to the Potikohua/Fox River (Mānuka Place). Its influence has led to the distinctive drainage pattern, soils and vegetation of the area as well as many cave systems. Rivers flowing from the Paparoa Range pass through the limestone syncline, creating subterranean waterways and extensive cave systems, creating a delicate karst landscape. Of particular importance is the quantity and quality of water flowing into or through the karst systems.

The Bullock Creek Farm Conservation Area is surrounded by Paparoa National Park, and hosts the Kotihotiho/Cave Creek resurgence and one of New Zealand's unique wetlands, the Punungairo/Bullock Creek polje (pronounced 'poll-yer') – a large, flat-floored depression in a karst landscape. Consideration may be given to adding this unique area to the Park to protect its values.

4.2 Management consideration
Ngā tikanga whakahaere

The priority ecosystem units in the Place – Dolomite Point and a portion of Pakiroa Flats – contain extensive and complex forest with a wide range of wildlife, including threatened and at-risk species such as lizards, pekapeka/long-tailed bats, kakaruai/South Island robin, South Island kākā and kākāriki/parakeets.

New Zealand's only breeding population of tāiko/Westland petrel lies within Paparoa National Park and on neighbouring Royal New Zealand Forest & Bird Protection Society and private land. The tāiko/Westland petrel are taonga species to Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae and their survival has great significance as these birds create a unique ecosystem and are one of the few petrel species remaining on the mainland of New Zealand. They inhabit much of the same breeding range on the West Coast of Te Waipounamu/South Island as they did before humans arrived. To protect the population and habitat of the tāiko/Westland petrel found in Paparoa National Park and their habitat, a Specially Protected Area, which limits public access to permit only, was gazetted in 1999. A nature reserve was also created adjoining the Specially Protected Area to protect and preserve the petrel flight paths from the sea to the petrel colony.

Fortunately, the large size and aggressive nature of the tāiko/Westland petrel allows them to more successfully defend themselves and their chicks against most predators, enabling them to survive where other petrel species have been lost. However, threats still exist, including feral cats, possum and uncontrolled dogs and goats, as well as land modification, power lines, exposed lighting and noise from low flying aircraft. To avoid disturbance to the tāiko/Westland petrel, a restricted airspace has been established around the Specially Protected Area.

In 2014, the extreme easterly winds of ex-tropical Cyclone Ita affected the forests of the West Coast including Paparoa National Park. This resulted in significant damage to patches of forest in the inland basin between Punakaiki River and Potikohua/Fox River including the Inland Pack Track, which runs from the Punakaiki River north to the Potikohua/Fox River. Outside the Park some windblown timber was harvested, but inside the Park it remains where it fell to become part of the life-cycle in the forest. Since Cyclone Ita parts of the Inland Pack Track have been cleared and re-opened.

Introduced pest plants and animals adversely affect indigenous habitats and species. Predators, particularly mustelids, cats and rats, challenge the survival of threatened and at-risk species in this Place. Pest control is undertaken in the Place and on adjoining lands by the Department, TBfree (OSPRI) 7 and the adjoining landowners, but the threats remains high. Goat control is undertaken by the Department, adjoining landowners and individuals; however, goat numbers and impacts remain high and are a priority for control.

State Highway 6 (the Highway) is one of the main routes and provides visitors with an opportunity to experience the dramatic scenery of the coastal fringe of this Place. It is part of the West Coast Heritage Highway and a significant tourist, commercial and recreational link between Greymouth and Westport. Increasing numbers of visitors are using the Highway to gain access to Punakaiki township, Dolomite Point, Truman Track and local tracks. It is important that the Highway and surrounding facilities safely provide for the needs of visitors and the local community. Certain works may be necessary within Paparoa National Park boundaries to achieve this.

The Highway between Punakaiki River and Punungairo/Bullock Creek is gazetted as a 'limited-access road' by New Zealand Transport Agency (the Transport Agency). This facilitates the maintenance of access to the state highway by the Transport Agency at a level that is least detrimental to the efficiency of the highway and the safety of the road user. Each access road, track and walk entrance, picnic area, car park and visitor centre joining the Highway where it is a limited-access road is required to be individually authorised by the Transport Agency.

The existing Highway is not aligned within the legal road boundary in all places due to practicality. The Department and the Transport Agency are endeavouring to rationalise the legal status and boundaries of the Highway and Paparoa National Park.

Paparoa National Park creates opportunities for commercial development on adjacent land, such as providing facilities for visitors. To protect national park values, development is ideally concentrated outside the Park in the Punakaiki area, from behind Dolomite Point to the gateway destination of Pororari River, and in Charleston. The Buller District Council provides for development in the Punakaiki township with restrictions due to coastal erosion and rockfall hazard.

To protect the natural quiet of the area, particularly around the Punakaiki village, aircraft landings and hovering in this Place are permitted for authorised filming activities, and hang-gliders and para-gliders only. Aircraft landings (including the use of remotely piloted aircraft (drones) at the Dolomite Point Pancake Rocks for recreational use are not permitted, to protect the visitor experience. While there is little demand for hang-gliding and para-gliding in Paparoa National Park, such usage may develop but is unlikely to cause conflict with other visitors.

Paparoa National Park will be affected by climate change, and coastal erosion threatens the Punakaiki township and sections of the Highway. Predicted sea level rises will increase with time, raising the risk from storm surge and waves.

Map 7b: Nīkau Place

Map 7b: Nikau Place
Note: High resolution maps are available at www.doc.govt.nz/paparoa.

Increased pressure from tourism is affecting visitor facilities, including areas inside Paparoa National Park, such as the Pancake Rocks, Truman Track and Pororari River Track, and those outside the Park, including the Punakaiki township, the Highway and the visitor centre near the Pancake Rocks.

The Punakaiki community and West Coast Regional and Buller and Grey District councils and others play an important role in the long-term plan for Paparoa National Park and in managing the threats and pressures affecting the area from climate change and increased tourism. The Department wishes to partner with the community and councils and all other relevant parties to address these issues through a 'Punakaiki Master Plan' exercise. Not all of the issues are within Paparoa National Park but the Park plays an important linking function to the supporting community and the visitors, and State Highway 6 plays an important role in facilitating ongoing access. See Map 7a and the Punakaiki enlargement.

4.3 Recreation values
Te tākarotanga

Like the iconic nīkau palm, the iconic features of Nīkau Place draw many visitors who experience the picturesque Pancake Rocks and other short day walks close to the Punakaiki community. The Truman Track begins on the edge of the Highway near the settlement of Te Miko, in a beautiful temperate rainforest of ferns, nīkau palms and rimu. The track then passes through coastal harakeke/flax flats before emerging onto a coastal headland with stunning views up and down the coastline. The Pororari River Track, which follows the river upstream from Punakaiki and connects with the Paparoa Track and Inland Pack Track (see Map 7 and the Punakaiki enlargement), passes through the Pororari River gorge, a valley lined on both sides by dramatic limestone cliffs and bluffs towering over the river.

Paparoa National Park is one of New Zealand's major recreational caving areas, with a variety of challenges and degrees of difficulty. Many caves have been documented and it is likely more will be discovered. The Punakaiki cavern and Potikohua/Fox River tourist cave are the most accessible and provide an opportunity to increase awareness and education about these delicate ecosystems. The breathtaking Ballroom Overhang, adjacent to the Potikohua/Fox River, has been carved by past water action giving the overhang a curved back wall with horizontal furrows. Other caves, such as those in the Punungairo/Bullock Creek caves system, are prone to flooding and subsequently more dangerous.

Many locals and visitors take advantage of this distinctive landscape by undertaking rock climbing, using Bullock Creek Road, the Bullock Creek Farm Conservation Area and Punakaiki River valley as access points to the climbs within and adjacent to Paparoa National Park. Due to the nature of the limestone a large number of these climbs have bolts and fixed anchors installed by climbers, and the climbs are well known and used. There is a need to manage the use of bolted and fixed anchors to make sure that park values, particularly landscape values and Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae cultural values, are not adversely affected.

4.4 Nīkau Place: Outcomes, polices and milestones
Nīkau Place: ngā hua, ngā kaupapa and ngā tohu

Table 7: Nīkau Place

Outcomes
Ngā hua

  1. The internationally outstanding landscape of Nīkau Place is treasured and supported by the Punakaiki community and visitors.
  2. The Pancake Rocks at Dolomite Point remain a world class visitor experience.
  3. The Punakaiki Master Plan has been developed and implemented, providing ongoing guidance and support to all parties, and protecting the natural character of Nīkau Place.
  4. The tāiko/Westland petrel population in the Specially Protected Area (Punakaiki) is protected from pest plants and animals and the adverse effects of human activities.
  5. Nīkau Place hosts a variety of outdoor adventures and activities where visitors enjoy a wide range of experiences from challenging climbing and caving activities, to easily accessible walking and vehicle use.
  6. The Inland Pack Track continues to be a popular track and the surrounding forest is enjoyed by those who walk it.
  7. Aircraft activity within Nīkau Place is of a low amount.
  8. A self-guided caving experience has been developed in Nīkau Place to help educate and increase awareness of the delicate ecosystems within the underground environments.
  9. State Highway 6 is recognised for its important role in facilitating access to Paparoa National Park. Activities in the Park are managed to ensure that the safe and efficient operation of State Highway 6 is not compromised.
  10. Prominent landscape and geological features remain in their natural state. Away from these, structures may be present where they blend into the landscape or where buildings already exist.
  11. The local community, landowners and businesses appreciate, support and are actively involved in conservation initiatives in Nīkau Place.

Policies
Ngā kaupapa


General
He kaupapa whānui


1. Should locate any new structures (including advertising materials) involving the promotion of businesses and services outside Nīkau Place unless adverse effects on natural, cultural and historic values can be avoided, remedied or mitigated.


2. Take a precautionary approach when considering applications for structures within Nīkau Place where they are potentially vulnerable to the effects of climate change.


Additions to Paparoa National Park
Te Pāka ā-iwi o Paparoa – ngā tāpiritanga


3. Consider, in consultation with Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae and the West Coast Tai Poutini Conservation Board, the addition 8 of Bullock Creek Farm Conservation Area to Paparoa National Park to protect the underlying hydrology of Punungairo/Bullock Creek polje.


4. Continue to support the ecological restoration of the Punungairo/Bullock Creek area.


Punakaiki Master Plan
Punakaiki – Te mahere matua


5. Work with Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae, the West Coast Tai Poutini Conservation Board, councils, New Zealand Transport Agency, adjoining landowners, businesses, other agencies and the community to undertake an integrated cross-boundary master planning exercise (the Punakaiki Master Plan), to resolve the pressures and issues facing the Punakaiki area, while protecting national park values.


Tāiko/Westland petrel


6. Work with Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae, the West Coast Tai Poutini Conservation Board, the Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Conservation Volunteers New Zealand, adjoining landowners, the community, the New Zealand Transport Agency and the Grey District Council to develop and implement an integrated management approach to protect the tāiko/Westland petrel, including:

  1. threat management, such as pest animal and plant surveillance and control;
  2. re-vegetation;
  3. impacts from adjoining land;
  4. shared resources where circumstances allow; and
  5. kaitiaki rights and responsibilities of Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae.


7. Should issue permits to access the Specially Protected Area only:

  1. for scientific research or the collection of material; or
  2. for wildlife viewing; and
  3. where a precautionary approach is applied, and any adverse effects, including from associated activities, on the tāiko/Westland petrel and their habitat, are avoided or mitigated.

Caving
Te torohē ana


8. Should manage the following caves as open access for public recreation use and to provide opportunities to increase awareness and education:

  1. Punakaiki cavern;
  2. Fox River tourist cave; and
  3. Babylon cave up to the locked gate.


9. Should manage the following caves as restricted or partially restricted access caves and passages where authorisation is required to enter them:

  1. Babylon cave (partially restricted beyond the locked gate); and
  2. Te Ana Titi cave (restricted).


10. Should authorise access for members of the New Zealand Speleological Society (NZSS), including the leading of non-NZSS members, to the Babylon cave beyond the locked gate, subject to safety requirements and adverse effects being avoided, remedied or mitigated.


11. Should authorise access to Te Ana Titi cave only for the purpose of scientific research.


12. Seek a bylaw to prohibit access to Te Ana Titi cave except for scientific research purposes.


13. Seek a bylaw to prohibit access to Babylon cave beyond the locked gate except in accordance with Policy 4.4.10.


14. Work with Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae, the West Coast Tai Poutini Conservation Board, New Zealand Speleological Society and other interested parties to develop a self-guided caving experience in Nīkau Place.


Climbing Development AreaTe wāhi piki


15. Work with the New Zealand Alpine Club (NZAC), the West Coast Alpine Club and other relevant groups to encourage a precautionary approach to the placement of bolts and fixed anchors within the Climbing Development Area, and shown on Map 7, in accordance with:

  1. NZAC's Position on Bolting (2010);
  2. the Bolting Technical Guidelines (2005);
  3. NZAC guidelines for climbing within the Climbing Development Area in Nīkau Place, as detailed in Policy 3.4.2; and
  4. any other updated guidance.

Camping
Te noho puni


16. Seek a bylaw to prohibit camping in the rock shelter and at the base of the cliffs within the Climbing Development Area in Nīkau Place, as shown on Map 7.


Paparoa Track
Te ara Paparoa


17. Manage the Paparoa Track in accordance with Policies 5.4.3–5.4.8 in Tī Kōuka Place, and ensure the Pororari River Track is used by walkers only to protect the experience of day walkers on this track.


Aircraft
Ngā waka rererangi


18. Should allow aircraft landings (including the use of remotely piloted aircraft (drones)) in the 'Filming only' area (as shown on Map 5) within Nīkau Place for filming activities only and in accordance with Filming Policies 3.10.1 and 3.10.2 in Part One: Te Wao Nui.


19. Should not allow the use of remotely piloted aircraft (drones) at Dolomite Point, Pancake Rocks.


20. Should allow aircraft landings outside of the 'Filming only' area and Red aircraft zone (as shown on Map 5) within Nīkau Place only:

  1. where there is a maximum of 20 landings per year a per concession (excluding hang-gliding and para-gliding) and no more than 2 concessionaires; or
  2. hang-gliding and para-gliding, where access to the launch site is from a formed track or route.


21. Should monitor aircraft landings within Nīkau Place and their effects on the natural, historic, recreation and cultural values of Nīkau Place. If evidence shows adverse effects are occurring, further restrictions may be applied.


Roading
Ngā ara


22. Work with the New Zealand Transport Agency and their contractors to ensure regard is given to adjacent national park values when undertaking all actions necessary to protect, maintain, improve or realign State Highway 6 and associated utilities, such as:

  1. road protection works, including:
    1. bridges and surrounding areas;
    2. flood protection;
    3. coastal erosion protection; and
  2. road maintenance, including:
    1. gravel and stone stock piles;
    2. clean fill sites;
    3. accessing road materials including gravel and stone; and
  3. vegetation clearance, including:
    1. public safety (improved road conditions and visibility);
    2. view point development and enhancement;
    3. car parking development and enhancement; and
    4. road alignment.


23. Should grant authorisations for gravel and stone stock piles only at agreed locations, and where:

  1. adverse effects, including visual effects, on natural, historic and cultural values, including Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae values, are avoided, remedied or mitigated;
  2. the material is treated to avoid introducing pest plants and other organisms; and
  3. the material is used at the earliest opportunity.


24. Should grant authorisations for clean fill sites for the disposal of spoil from construction work, only where:

  1. the material is treated to avoid introduced pest plants and other organisms; and
  2. adverse effects, including visual effects, on natural, historic and cultural values, including Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae values, are avoided, remedied or mitigated.

    Mechanisms that may be used to address adverse effects include;
    1. landscaping and re-vegetation; and
    2. habitat restoration.


25. Should grant authorisations to access material required for road construction only in accordance with Part One: Te Wao Nui Policies 3.16.1–3.16.4.


26. Work with the Transport Agency and their contractors to protect national park values, adjacent to State Highway 6, including:

  1. pest plant management and control;
  2. re-vegetation of surplus Highway areas resulting from realignment; and
  3. shared resources where circumstances allow.


27. Work with the Transport Agency on the rationalisation of the State Highway 6 legal road boundary through Paparoa National Park, where:

  1. options for realignment or reconstruction cannot be accommodated within the existing legal road;
  2. the proposal is supported by the Department, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae and the West Coast Tai Poutini Conservation Board as being in the best interest overall of Paparoa National Park;
  3. there are no significant adverse effects on:
    1. threatened or at-risk species or their habitats;
    2. historic and cultural values; or
    3. landscape or scenic values; and
    4. redundant legal road is rehabilitated to a standard consistent with adjacent Park values.


28. Consult with the Transport Agency and their contractors on the development of Park facilities, including track or walk entrances, picnic sites, car parks and visitor centres, which may access the limited-access road section of State Highway 6 and impact Highway management.


Milestones
Ngā tohu

Achieved by the end of Year 3 (2019)


1. An investigation of Bullock Creek Farm Conservation Area for national park values, and reclassification if required, has been initiated.


2. The master planning exercise for Punakaiki has begun, identifying priorities and expectations.


3. A review of the West Coast Cave and Karst Management Strategy and operational guidelines has begun.


4. The New Zealand Alpine Club guidelines for bolted and fixed climbs within the Climbing Development Area in Nīkau Place and any other authorised climbing development areas has been developed and is being implemented.


5. An assessment of the effectiveness of the 'Filming only' aircraft management area and the impact on the community has been undertaken.


Achieved by the end of Year 5 (2021)


6. The recommendations of the Bullock Creek Farm Conservation Area investigation are being implemented, if required.


7. The master planning exercise for Punakaiki has been completed and priorities are being implemented.


8. A review of the West Coast Cave and Karst Management Strategy and operational guidelines has been completed and is being implemented.


9. A report on the implementation and any review of the New Zealand Alpine Club guidelines for bolted and fixed climbs within the Climbing Development Area in Nīkau Place and any other authorised climbing development area has been completed.


10. The level of use in, and the effects of, the aircraft 'Filming only' management area have been reviewed and recommendations made, and are being implemented.


Achieved by the end of Year 10 (2026)


11. The master planning exercise for Punakaiki has been successful and the area has been enhanced for residents, business owners and visitors (as determined by agreed indicators).


12. The New Zealand Alpine Club guidelines for bolted and fixed climbs within the Climbing Development Area in Nīkau Place and any other authorised climbing development area is being implemented and reviewed as required.


13. The day walking experience of the Pororari River Track has been retained.


14. The level of use and effects of activities undertaken in Nīkau Place have been monitored and reviewed.


15. The Inland Pack Track remains open and is valued by the local West Coast communities and visitors.

5. Tī Kōuka Place

The tī kōuka/cabbage tree is taonga to Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae due to its various uses from food and fire starting, to textiles for rope, fishing lines, baskets, waterproof rain capes and sandals. This multi-use attribute can be linked to the southern area of Paparoa National Park (see Map 8), where many activities such as cycling, walking and tramping occur.

5.1 Description
Te āhua

A dramatic natural feature of Tī Kōuka Place is the inland escarpment at the head of the Punakaiki River catchment which forms the western margin of the inland syncline. The forest vegetation in the inland area is predominately beech with a scattering of rimu, mamaku/tree ferns and other broad leaved trees.

Tī kōuka is known as a tree that can adapt and regenerate, in the same way that the southern area has evolved with the addition of the new Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track. Tī kōuka is also associated with mortality through the whakataukī 'ehara i te tī e wana ake' (it's not as if he's a tī tree that will sprout again), which reminds humans that they cannot regenerate in the way that a tī kōuka can. This tree, coupled with its traditional use in cleansing rituals, is relevant for the southern Place because of the Pike River mine disaster, as a reminder of the tragic loss of life.

The men will be remembered in Tī Kōuka Place through an Interpretation Centre at the Pike River mine site, where displays and memorabilia tell the story of the mine, the disaster and the resulting changes to health and safety requirements. The mine portal is a place of quiet reflection to remember the 29 lives lost in the tragedy.

This area of Paparoa National Park was traversed by Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae and used for the gathering of mahinga kai. Tī kōuka provided durable and strong fibre for textiles, rope fishing line and baskets and was also used as waterproof rain cape, cloaks and footwear. The many uses of this tree link directly to the many uses of this area of Paparoa National Park. Historically only visited by a few hardy backcountry explorers and hunters, Tī Kōuka Place is an area of increasing activity with the development of the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track, and opportunities for walking, tramping and biking. However, it retains a backcountry experience, while the mountainous parts of Tī Kōuka Place retain a remote quality.

Map 8: Tī Kōuka Place

Map 8: Ti Kouka Place
Note: High resolution maps are available at www.doc.govt.nz/paparoa.

5.2 Management consideration
Ngā tikanga whakahaere

The priority ecosystem unit in Tī Kōuka Place – Saxton/Otututu Ecological Area – contains an altitudinal sequence from glacial terraces up onto granite hillslopes with a complex mix of pakihi and conifer, broadleaved and beech dominated forests, with subalpine grasslands. The ecosystems in this Place support a wide range of wildlife, including threatened and at-risk species such as roroa/great spotted kiwi, kea, kākā, whio/blue duck, mātā/fernbird and koekoeā/long-tailed cuckoo. Tī Kōuka is also home to the Paparoa Range alpine snail (Powelliphanta gagei).

The Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track may provide a corridor for predators, particularly mustelids, cats, rats, possums and goats to move easily through the forest. A pest control programme for the track is to be developed as well as individual and community initiatives encouraged.

Aircraft landings in Tī Kōuka Place are required for monitoring the mine site, administration buildings and ventilation shaft, and for those wanting to remember the Pike River mine men. Aircraft landings for the facilitation of recreational users are permitted.

Tī Kōuka Place is managed for its special wildlife and its outstanding natural features, as well as a Place of remembrance.

5.3 Recreation values
Te tākarotanga

Like the tī kōuka, this area has many uses. Tī Kōuka Place provides a multi-day walking and mountain biking (excluding e-bikes) opportunity on the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track. These tracks link with the Croesus Track (outside the Park) and offers access to a previously untracked area only explored by hardy adventurers and hunters.

Access to the Paparoa Track can be undertaken in a number of ways: from Blackball or Barrytown via the Croesus Track; from Punakaiki via the Pororari River Track (for walkers only) or Waikori Road (for walkers and mountain bikers) (in Nīkau Place, see Map 7); or from the Pike River mine road and the Pike29 Memorial Track. The tracks from Punakaiki along the Pororari River to the first hut on the Tindale Ridge can also be accessed by all terrain wheelchairs. A day-walk opportunity is available from the Pike River mine administration buildings to the portal and ventilation shaft viewing area along the Pike29 Memorial Track.

As a result of the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track a number of commercial opportunities may develop, which could include guided walking, biking and transport to and from the track ends. The development of purpose built concessionaire huts and the use of e-bikes may be considered sometime in the future once the track has matured.

Management of the recreation opportunities in Tī Kōuka Place seeks to maintain, as far as possible, the natural remote setting of this Place.

5.4 Tī Kōuka Place: Outcomes, policies and milestones
Tī Kōuka Place: ngā hua, ngā kaupapa and ngā tohu

Table 8: Tī Kōuka Place

Outcomes
Ngā hua

  1. The Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track are successful multi-day, multi-use tracks, providing a link between the internationally significant coastal landscape of Punakaiki and the mining heritage of the Pike River mine and Blackball. The Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track are also enjoyed by visitors for their easily accessible day walking and mountain biking opportunities, and are available for controlled competitive sporting events.
  2. Tī Kōuka Place hosts outdoor adventures and activities for visitors with a range of abilities, including:
    1. challenging overnight walking and mountain biking tracks;
    2. easier day walking and mountain biking opportunities;
    3. areas for quiet reflection and remembrance;
    4. powered vehicle access to the information centre at the former Pike River mine site; and
    5. areas where the remote characteristics of Tī Kōuka Place prevail.
  3. Prominent landscapes and geological features remain in their natural state. Away from these landscapes and features, structures, including utilities such as telecommunication sites, may be present where they blend into the landscape or where buildings already exist.
  4. Visitors to Tī Kōuka Place experience moderate encounters with aircraft.

Policies
Ngā kaupapa


General
He kaupapa whānui


1. Encourage individual and community initiatives for, and participation in goat control programmes to support the Department's programmes and other pest control in Tī Kōuka Place, including along the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track.


2. Ensure appropriate respect for the Pike River mine site in accordance with Ngāti Waewae tikanga.


Pike29 Memorial Track and Paparoa Track
Te ara Pike29 and Te ara Paparoa


3. Manage the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track as year-round, multi-day, shared use experiences.


4. Provide vehicle access to the start of the Pike29 Memorial Track (at the Pike River mine end), mine portal and information via the Pike River mine road.


5. Seek a bylaw to:

  1. require people to book before staying in a hut or designated campsite on the Paparoa Track;
  2. prohibit people from staying more than two consecutive nights in any one hut or designated campsite on the Paparoa Track; and
  3. prohibit camping within 500 metres of the entire length of the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track, unless within designated campsites.


6. Should not provide for mountain biking activities such as downhill, freestyle and dirt jumping on the Pike29 Memorial Track and the 7. Paparoa Track.


7. Should grant concessions for commercial operations and services (including aircraft activities, in accordance with Policies 5.4.10–5.4.17) on the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track, only where they:

  1. provide services and backcountry accommodation for guided and/or unguided walkers and bikers on the track; and
  2. increase the range of opportunities available in Paparoa National Park without affecting other visitors' use and enjoyment of the Park.


8. May authorise no more than two organised sporting or other competitive events on the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track only in accordance with Part One: Te Wao Nui Policies 3.11.1–3.11.6; and if approved research demonstrates unacceptable adverse effects, on the experiences of other track users or on national park values generally, further restrictions may apply.


9. May consider the use of electric power-assisted pedal cycles (e-bikes) on the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track by way of a partial review of this Plan, following a full review of the use of e-bikes on public conservation lands and waters, including a review of the Department's October 2015 Guideline Electric bikes on public conservation land.


Aircraft
Ngā waka rererangi


10. Should grant concessions for aircraft landings adjacent to the Paparoa Track within Tī Kōuka Place only in accordance with:

  1. Policy 5.4.15; or
  2. Part One: Te Wao Nui Policies 3.8.1–3.8.9; and
  3. the following criteria:
    1. at the designated landing sites at the huts on the Paparoa Track, for the transportation of packs, mountain bikes and passengers, where there are no more than five landings per hut per day;
    2. at the agreed landing sites on the escarpment, for the transportation of packs, mountain bikes and passengers, where:
      1. there are no more than:
        1. two landings per day; and
        2. 20 landings per year;
      2. people and bikes landed use a formed track or route to access the Paparoa Track; and
    3. if evidence shows that adverse effects are occurring at the escarpment landing sites, management of the landings at these sites may change;
    4. no more than two concessions are granted; and
    5. the transportation of mountain bikes (in addition to packs and passengers) is only granted to one concessionaire on a five-year trial basis.


11. Should not grant concessions for aircraft landings to transport mountain bikes at the sites identified in Policy 5.4.10, following the completion of the five-year trial, unless a partial review of this Plan has been undertaken and it has been demonstrated that:

  1. demand is evident;
  2. the benefit, use and enjoyment of other users can be protected; and
  3. adverse effects on natural, historic and cultural values can be avoided, mitigated or minimised.


12. Should grant concessions for aircraft landings within Tī Kōuka Place only in accordance with Part One: Te Wao Nui Policies 3.8.1–3.8.9 and at the following landing sites or for the following purposes:

  1. the ventilation shaft and the portal of the Pike River mine, only where the landings are for family members of the Pike River mine men; and
  2. landing sites other than those identified in Policy 5.4.10 or clause a) above, where there are no more than:
    1. two landings per day at any one site;
    2. two concessionaires; and
    3. 20 landings per concession per year.


13. Should grant concessions for hang-gliding and para-gliding, where access to the launch site is from a formed track or route.


14. Should not grant concessions for recreational aircraft landings at the ventilation shaft or the portal of the Pike River mine.


15. May grant concessions for aircraft landings on the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track, where the landings do not comply with the limits and/or criteria in Policy 5.4.10 only in support of sporting events.


16. Should not grant concessions for aircraft landings within Tī Kōuka Place on the 19th November in any given year, in memory of the Pike River mine disaster, unless required by the families of the Pike River mine men.


17. Should monitor aircraft landings within Tī Kōuka Place and their effects on the natural, historic, recreation and cultural values of Tī Kōuka Place. If evidence shows adverse effects are occurring, further restrictions may be applied.


Partial review


18. Carry out a full analysis of whether to allow:

  1. the aircraft landings provided for by Policy 5.4.10c)v) beyond the initial five-year period; and
  2. electric power-assisted pedal cycles (e-bikes) on the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track

by way of a partial review of this Plan. The analysis should include:

  1. experiences elsewhere on public conservation land, particularly the Heaphy Track and the Old Ghost Road Track;
  2. consideration of the costs and benefits of any changes, consistent with the General Policy for National Parks 2005;
  3. any economic benefits to public conservation lands and the Buller District;
  4. adverse effects of additional activities on recreational experience; and
  5. any safety implications.
Milestones
Ngā tohu

Achieved by the end of Year 3 (2019)


1. The construction of the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track has been completed and the tracks are operational.


2. The level of use and effects of aircraft activity are being monitored.


3. Community involvement in pest control programmes is being encouraged and supported, including initiatives on the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track and goat control in Tī Kōuka Place and throughout Paparoa National Park.


Achieved by the end of Year 5 (2021)


4. A report has been prepared on the monitoring results for the aircraft landing provisions in Policy 5.4.10; including a full analysis of whether to allow the transportation of mountain bikes beyond the initial five-year period by way of partial review of this Plan.


5. A report has been prepared on the analysis and review of the use of electric power-assisted pedal cycles (e-bikes) and the Department's Guideline Electric bikes on public conservation land, and whether to consider their use on the Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track by way of a partial review of this Plan.


6. The Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track have reached their target visitor numbers and local communities are benefitting (as determined by agreed indicators). The Department is working with others to expand opportunities on the tracks while maintaining the high quality visitor experience.


7. The level of use and effects of aircraft activity have been reviewed, and recommendations have been made and implemented if there is any evidence of adverse effects.


Achieved by the end of Year 10 (2026)


8. The Pike29 Memorial Track and the Paparoa Track are successful and valued by the local community and visitors (as measured by agreed indicators).


9. The level of use and effects of activities undertaken in Tī Kōuka Place has been monitored and reviewed.

6. Mānuka Place

Mānuka are hardy and known for growing in extreme conditions and rain – two attributes of the northern area of Paparoa National Park. The mānuka is also associated with challenges and bravery due to it being the wood of choice for many weapons; hence the whakataukī 'kua takoto te mānuka' (to take up the challenge). This area of Paparoa National Park (see Map 9) lays down many challenges to people through its isolated and untouched characteristics, and provides opportunities for natural quiet and truly remote experiences for those seeking peace and healing, in the same way mānuka supports the wellbeing of people through its medicinal properties.

6.1 Description
Te āhua

Apart from some specific sites, Mānuka Place is the least visited Place in Paparoa National Park and as a result has fewer demands placed upon it. The mountainous parts of the Place retain a remote quality and in many aspects, it takes care of itself; however, the vegetation, soils and sense of solitude are delicate in nature.

Map 9: Mānuka Place

Map 9: Manuka Place
Note: High resolution maps are available at www.doc.govt.nz/paparoa.

The geology, altitude and a cool wet climate make the spine of the Paparoa Range very different from the humid coastal lowlands. At the bushline, open silver beech forest merges with sub-alpine scrub of Dracophyllum, pink pine, Coprosma and mountain flax. The proportionally small area of Paparoa National Park above the bushline contains a great variety of herbaceous species and a number of more spectacular plants such as alpine daisies and gentians. Expanses of snow tussock are a predominant feature along with Olearia shrubs, cushion bog and carpet grass.

The healing and sustaining attributes of this area are also related to its mahinga kai values. This remote area of Paparoa National Park was traversed by Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae and used for the gathering of mahinga kai, for food, weaving, medicinal purposes, clothing, and also for trade. Plant and animal species were used in barter to obtain valuable resources from travellers or neighbouring communities. Many of these plant species and practices are still used today by mana whenua ensuring traditional mahinga kai practices are passed to the next generations.

The whakataukī 'kua takoto te mānuka' (to take up the challenge) is very fitting for this remote and wild part of Paparoa National Park. Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae tūpuna (ancestors) were the first to take on these challenges through creating and using a comprehensive network of trails which ensured safe journeys up and down the coast. The trails were not only from north to south along the coast but also from east to west following rivers and crossing ranges. Trails provided access to significant mahinga kai resources, which was fundamental to survival, and caves provided shelter for travellers. Today, the challenges of Mānuka Place are also taken up by trampers and other explorers.

The abundance of flora and fauna in itself attracts people to this Place, and there are also those who are intrigued by the karst features. The northern part of Mānuka Place between the Potikohua/Fox and Tiropahi rivers is the largest area of unmodified karst in the Barrytown syncline and is a nationally significant example of lowland polygonal karst in a natural forested environment. There are sinking and resurging streams, huge collapsed dolines, grykes, numerous solution dolines, significant examples of karren and numerous caves, some of which are very large and spectacular.

Many of the caves are storehouses for important fossil and sub-fossil material of birds, reptiles and even mammals – including kōiwi/human remains. Ngāti Waewae ancestors are known to have sought shelter within these karst caves.

6.2 Management consideration
Ngā tikanga whakahaere

The priority ecosystem unit, Tiropahi pakihi, includes rimu, mānuka and yellow silver pine forests. The remainder of this Place supports an extensive and complex forest and sensitive alpine communities. It contains a wide range of wildlife, including threatened and at-risk species such as large land snails like Powelliphanta gagei.

Introduced pest plants and animals threaten indigenous habitats and species. Predators, particularly mustelids, cats and rats, challenge the survival of threatened species in this Place. Goats are found in high numbers in the upper catchments of the Punakaiki and Pororari rivers and on the alpine tops, having a high impact on the vegetation. Despite control being undertaken by the Department, adjoining landowners and individuals, goat numbers and their impacts remain high; and so goats are a priority for control.

Aircraft activity in this area is for management purposes only. There are no new tracks proposed in Mānuka Place at the time of approval of this Plan; however, there is the opportunity for new tracks to be developed in the future to provide further access to Paparoa National Park where demand is evident. Commercial development in this area is most likely to be on land adjacent to the Park in the coastal area to the north of Potikohua/Fox River rather than the more remote interior.

Mānuka Place is managed to maintain, as far as possible, its natural remote setting.

6.3 Recreation values
Te tākarotanga

Mānuka Place provides opportunities for solitude and self-reliance with very few tracks and no facilities. It is not easy country for inexperienced visitors but mountain climbers, trampers and hunters enjoy this remote Place. A route to Mt Bovis east of Bullock Creek Farm Conservation Area provides visitors with an alpine experience.

As a form of recreation, caving is a specialised activity, as caves by their very nature are often dangerous for an inexperienced recreationist and many caves in Paparoa National Park are subject to rapid flooding. Experienced cavers, most of whom are members of the New Zealand Speleological Society (NZSS) or an affiliated caving group, can be expected to have a reasonable level of caving proficiency and awareness of the dangers to themselves and the environment. A programme is in place which monitors the effects of access on the delicate cave environment.

Along with taking up the challenges laid by the karst features of Mānuka Place, the NZSS performs a valuable function in exploring, mapping and documenting caves and other karst features, which is essential information for management. Te Ananui/Metro cave is particularly suitable for interpretation and guiding opportunities.

Mānuka Place is a place of natural quiet and solitude.

6.4 Mānuka Place: Outcomes, policies and milestones
Mānuka Place: ngā hua, ngā kaupapa and ngā tohu

Table 9: Mānuka Place

Outcomes
Ngā hua

  1. The self-reliant opportunities and sense of solitude in Mānuka Place are protected, with few recreation facilities and fewer encounters with other visitors. Visitors can expect to be away from the sights and sounds of human influence.
  2. Mānuka Place hosts challenging outdoor adventures and activities where visitors enjoy a range of backcountry and remote experiences from formed alpine tracks to more demanding, solitude-seeking activities.
  3. Prominent landscape and geological features remain in their natural state. Away from these features, structures, including utilities such as telecommunication sites, may be present where well-blended into the landscape or where buildings already exist.

Policies
Ngā kaupapa


Additions to Paparoa National Park


1. Consider, in consultation with Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae and the West Coast Tai Poutini Conservation Board, the addition of the following areas to Paparoa National Park to protect the significant caves in these areas:

  1. Tiropahi Ecological Area;
  2. Charleston Conservation Area; and
  3. Nile River Conservation Area.

Caving
Te torohē ana


2. Should manage Te Ananui/Metro cave as a restricted access cave where authorisation is required to enter it.


3. Should authorise access to Te Ananui/Metro cave for members of the New Zealand Speleological Society (NZSS), subject to safety requirements and adverse effects being avoided, remedied or mitigated.


4. Should allow access to Te Ananui/Metro cave as one concession opportunity only and in accordance with Part One: Te Wao Nui Policies 3.3.1–3.3.4 and the following conditions:

  1. adverse effects on the cave are avoided, remedied or mitigated;
  2. groups are limited to 8 people plus guide for cave rafting;
  3. groups are limited to 10 people plus guide for scenic/glow worm tours;
  4. no more than 10 trips per day for cave rafting tours, between the hours of 7am and 6pm;
  5. no more than 10 trips per day for scenic/glow worm tours, between the hours of 7am and midnight;
  6. avoidance of effects on sites of significance to Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae;
  7. the concessionaire is a member of the New Zealand Speleological Society and/or the Australasian Cave & Karst Management Association Inc, to ensure they are up to date on current practices and equipment; and
  8. all safety concerns are addressed.


5. Continue the monitoring programme to determine whether there are any adverse effects resulting from access to cave and karst systems in Mānuka Place. This monitoring should focus on Te Ananui/Metro cave.


6. If monitoring shows adverse effects are occurring, further restriction to the concession activity may be applied.


7. Seek a bylaw to prohibit access to Te Ananui/Metro cave unless authorised in accordance with Policies 6.4.2–6.4.4.


Aircraft
Ngā waka rererangi


8. Should allow aircraft landings within Mānuka Place only in accordance with the aircraft access zones on Map 5 and Part One: Te Wao Nui Policies 3.8.1–3.8.9.


Wilding trees/Forestry
Ngā taru tawhiti/te ngaherehere


9. Work with Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae, adjoining landowners, councils and the community on programmes, as required, aimed at controlling wilding trees at zero density using sustained control, both inside and outside Paparoa National Park.

Milestones
Ngā tohu


Achieved by the end of Year 3 (2019)


1. An investigation of Tiropahi Ecological Area, Charleston Conservation Area and Nile River Conservation Area for National Park values, and reclassification has been initiated.


2. Report annually on the monitoring programme undertaken for Te Anaui/Metro cave.


Achieved by the end of Year 5 (2021)


3. The recommendations of the Tiropahi Ecological Area, Charleston Conservation Area and Nile River Conservation Area investigation are being implemented, if required.


Achieved by the end of Year 10 (2026)


4. Access to Te Anaui/Metro cave has been retained by way of permit for NZSS members and concessionaires, only if any adverse effects identified have been adequately avoided, remedied or mitigated.


5. The remote solitude seeking experience of Mānuka Place is retained.

7. Horoeka Place

The wood of Horoeka/lancewood was traditionally used to fashion spears for hunting, and this relationship with hunting links this taonga species to the eastern area of Paparoa National Park (see Map 10). Horoeka is also iconic due to its dramatic differences in form at different stages of its life cycle. The distinct forms can be likened to the distinct and separate areas of Paparoa National Park clustered within the eastern area.

Map 10: Horoeka Place

Map 10: Horoeka Place
Note: High resolution maps are available at www.doc.govt.nz/paparoa.

7.1 Description

Horoeka Place incorporates the six small separate parcels of Paparoa National Park sitting to the east of the main body of the Park. These additions to the Park resulted from the government's decision in 2001 to cease logging native trees in Crown-owned forests on the West Coast.

Horoeka Place extends from the terraces of the Otututu (Rough) River in the south, north-east towards Reefton, and then from Larrys Creek northwards close to State Highway 69, to Inangahua Junction. The vegetation is generally a mixture of beech forest, with mainly silver beech and some red beech, and podocarp forest. Weed species such as gorse, hydrangea, blackberry and German ivy occur near old settlements and along road edges due to the different land uses in the area.

Horoeka Place is used predominately by local communities for a range of recreation activities, including short day walks on several old forestry tracks. The parcels of Paparoa National Park adjoin assorted public conservation lands and waters and private land, and as a result there are many access points to Horoeka Place. The river valleys of Horoeka Place were originally traversed by Ngāi Tahu/Ngāti Waewae tūpuna, and used for the gathering of mahinga kai, particularly birds and tuna/eel.

Horoeka is used by mana whenua for its straight stems, particularly as spears for hunting. This link to hunting continues through the wider local community who also use this area for hunting deer, pigs and goats.

7.2 Management considerations
Ngā tikanga whakahaere

The area supports a range of forest and more open country species including korimako/bellbird, tūī, pīwakawaka/South Island fantail, kiwi, whio/blue duck, kāhu/Australasian harrier and warou/welcome swallows.

Introduced pest plants and animals threaten indigenous habitats and species. Pest control is undertaken by the Department, TBfree (OSPRI) and community initiatives to control pests in the area are encouraged. Pigs are present in Horoeka Place, particularly in the north around Hard Creek near Inangahua. Pigs impact on invertebrates and ground-nesting birds, and hunters are encouraged to actively hunt them.

Due to the previous use of these areas prior to becoming national park, there are several anomalies within this Place. Examples include: formed roads, a plantation of eucalyptus trees which will be harvested in due course, and several old mines, with one existing gold mine still being worked today.

In addition, to protect the limestone cliffs and forest scosystems of this area, opportunities to expand Paparoa National Park are taken. For example, 152 ha of lowland podocarp/beech forest on fertile limestone alluvium between Ruff Creek and Yorke Creek has been identified for addition to the Park and would sit within Horoeka Place.

Unlike other parts of Paparoa National Park, the formed roads provide access into Horoeka Place by either motor vehicle or mountain bike. Several of the existing roads do not align with the legal road boundaries; this may be due to a number of reasons including practicality.

The Department, New Zealand Transport Agency and Buller District Council are endeavouring to rationalise the legal status and boundaries.

The placement of beehives has previously occurred in the Bullock Creek Farm Conservation Area and not inside the Park. Given the existing formed roads within Horoeka Place the placement of beehives could be considered in this area.

Aircraft landings in Horoeka Place are relatively low given the amount of private land where aircraft landings can occur. However, from time to time landings are required inside this Place to position recreational fishers and other users.

7.3 Recreation values
Te tākarotanga

Horoeka Place is a popular area for recreational hunting of pigs, red and fallow deer. While there are no maintained tracks there are several historical routes through Paparoa National Park to Mt Stevenson, as well as Mt Wise and Mt Steele. These are used by the local community, including schools and clubs for educational purposes.

Horoeka Place is hugely influenced by its surrounding areas, and it is managed to support local recreational activities.

7.4 Horoeka Place: Strategic, statutory and business planning
Horeka Place: Ngā hua, ngā kaupapa and ngā tohu

Table 10: Horoeka Place

Outcomes
Ngā hua

  1. The community use and enjoyment of Horoeka Place is maintained.
  2. Recreation facilities such as the historic walking routes are maintained by the community and visitors appreciate the short enjoyable walks.
  3. Prominent landscapes and geological features remain in their natural state. Away from these landscapes and features, structures, including utilities such as telecommunication sites, may be present where well-blended into landscape or where buildings already exist.

Policies
Ngā kaupapa


General
He kaupapa whānui


1. Should locate any new structures (including advertising materials) involving the promotion of businesses and services outside Horoeka Place unless adverse effects on natural, cultural and historic values can be avoided, remedied or mitigated.


2. Encourage individual and community initiatives to maintain tracks in Horoeka Place.


3. Work with Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae and the community (including regional agencies and hunting groups) to raise awareness of adverse effects of pigs and to encourage pig hunting to limit the population growth and spread.


4. Encourage individual and community initiatives for, and participation in, goat control programmes to support the Department's programmes and other pest control in Horoeka Place.


Wilding trees/Forestry
Ngā taru tawhiti/te ngaherehere


5. Work with Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae, adjoining landowners, councils and the community on programmes, as required, aimed at controlling wilding trees at zero density using sustained control, both inside and outside Paparoa National Park.


6. Harvest the plantation of eucalyptus trees when they mature, and plan an ecological restoration programme for the site in consultation with Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae and the community.


Aircraft
Ngā waka rererangi


7. Should allow aircraft landings within Horoeka Place only in accordance with the aircraft access zones on Map 5 and Part One: Te Wao Nui Policies 3.8.1–3.8.9.


Beehives
Ngā pouaka pī


8. May grant concessions for the placement of beehives within Horoeka Place, where:

  1. conflict with other users is avoided, remedied or mitigated;
  2. beehives are only placed in areas where vegetation clearance is not required; and
  3. a suitable buffer exists between concessionaires.

Additions to Paparoa National Park
Te Pāka ā-iwi o Paparoa – ngā tāpiritanga


9. Consider, in consultation with Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae and the West Coast Tai Poutini Conservation Board, the addition of the scenic reserve between Ruff Creek and Yorke Creek to Paparoa National Park to protect the outstanding values of this area.

Milestones
Ngā tohu


Achieved by the end of Year 3 (2019)


1. A programme to control wilding trees within Horoeka Place has been established and is being implemented.


2. Partnerships with the community and local groups to maintain local tracks and undertake weed and pest control have been initiated.


3. The level of use and effects of aircraft activity are being monitored.


4. The investigation of the scenic reserve between Ruff Creek and Yorke Creek for national park values and reclassification if required, has been completed.


Achieved by the end of Year 5 (2021)


5. The level of use and effects of aircraft activity has been reviewed, and recommendations have been implemented, if required.


Achieved by the end of Year 10 (2026)


6. The wildling tree programme in Horoeka Place has been successful.


7. The eucalyptus trees have been harvested and an ecological restoration programme for that area has begun.


7 The not-for-profit limited company responsible for the TBfree programme, which aims to eradicate bovine TB from New Zealand.

8 Additions to national parks are undertaken in accordance with Sections 7 or 8 of the National Parks Act 1980.

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