In the “Paparoa National Park Management Plan

A

Actively conserved historic site

Historically significant site that is managed by the Department to preserve and maintain its historic features.

Activity

Includes a trade, business, or occupation (National Parks Act 1980, section 2).

Aerially assisted trophy hunting
  1. A wild animal recovery operation activity, authorised under the Wild Animal Control Act 1977 (whether or not for hire or reward) to carry out the activity of aerially assisted trophy hunting, where an aircraft is used for all of the following purposes and no other:
    1. to carry by aircraft recreational hunter(s), their guide, associated firearms/ammunition; and
    2. the active searching by aircraft for wild animals with trophy potential; and
    3. the on-the-ground guiding of the client and killing of the wild animals, and
    4. the recovery by aircraft of such wild animals.
  2. The activity is still considered to be aerially assisted trophy hunting if one or more of the above components is performed or achieved.

    Note: this definition excludes the following activities:

    1. live capture and carriage of wild animals.
    2. the killing of any deer species during the period 23 March to 9 April plus, when it falls outside this period, the 4 days of Easter.
    3. the killing and recovery of wild animals or any part thereof for supply to a New Zealand Food Safety Authority-approved processing facility.
    4. the carriage or use of a shotgun.
Aircraft

Any machine that can derive support in the atmosphere from the reactions of the air otherwise than by the reactions of the air against the surface of the earth (Civil Aviation Act 1990, section 2). This includes, but is not limited to, the following types of aircraft: powered and non-powered; recreational and commercial; fixed-wing and rotary-wing; manned and remotely piloted aircraft systems; and any other aircraft that may become regulated by Civil Aviation Rules from time to time.

See also Aircraft, non-powered and Aircraft system, remotely piloted.

Aircraft, control line model

A model aircraft primarily controlled in flight by a single or multiple wire system operated by the person flying the aircraft and restricted to circular flight about a centre point.

Aircraft, free flight model

A model aircraft with a maximum wing loading of 62 g/dm² (20 oz/ft²), with a flight path that, once launched, is uncontrollable.

Aircraft, non-powered

Any machine not driven by a powered device that can derive support in the atmosphere from the reactions of the air otherwise than by the reactions of the air against the surface of the earth. This is an inclusive definition that includes non-powered gliders, non-powered hang gliders, parachutes, balloons and any other non-powered aircraft that may become regulated by Civil Aviation Rules from time to time.

See also Aircraft.

Aircraft, remotely piloted (drones)

An unmanned aircraft that is piloted from a remote station and:

  1. includes a radio controlled model aircraft, but
  2. does not include a control line model aircraft or a free flight model aircraft;

or as regulated by Civil Aviation Rules from time to time.

Airstrip

Any specified area of public conservation land specifically maintained for the landing and take-off of fixed-wing aircraft, which may also be used by rotary-wing aircraft. It does not include a certified aerodrome as defined by the National Parks Act 1980 or an airport as defined by the Airport Authorities Act 1966.

Animal

Any mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish (including shellfish) or related organism, insect, crustacean, or organism of every kind; but does not include a human being (National Parks Act 1980, section 2).

Archaeological site

Subject to section 42(3) Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014:

  1. any place in New Zealand, including any building or structure (or part of a building or structure), that:
    1. was associated with human activity that occurred before 1900 or is the site of the wreck of any vessel where the wreck occurred before 1900; and
    2. provides or may provide, through investigation by archaeological methods, evidence relating to the history of New Zealand; and
  2. includes a site for which a declaration is made under section 43(1) (Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014, section 6).
At risk (species)

Taxa that do not meet the criteria for any of the 'Threatened' species categories, but are declining (though buffered by a large total population size and/or a slow decline rate), biologically scarce, recovering from a previously threatened status, or survive only in relictual populations (NZ Threat Classification System Manual 2008).

Authorisation

Collective term for all types of approvals by the Minister and the Director-General of Conservation provided for in a statutory process (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

See also Concession.

Authorised

Approved in a statutory process.

B

Backcountry destination

Destination which provides for more challenging adventures for visitors, including popular walks and tramps, within the body of large scale natural settings.

Biodiversity

The variability among living organisms from all sources including terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and ecological complexes of which they are part. This includes diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Biosecurity

The exclusion, eradication or effective management of risks posed by pests and diseases to the economy, environment and human health (General Policy for National Parks 2005). The Department has functions which it performs under the Biosecurity Act 1993.

Building

Has the same meaning as given to it by sections 8 and 9 of the Building Act 2004 (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Bylaw

A bylaw made by the Minister of Conservation, under section 56 of the National
Parks Act 1980.

C

Caving

The entry of individuals into and/or movement by individuals within or through caves for the purpose of management, tourism, recreation, science, search and rescue, or other purposes.

Cirque

A half open, steep sided hollow at the head of a valley or on a mountainside, formed by erosion.

Climate change impacts

All direct and indirect impacts of climate change. This includes:

  1. Impacts from changes in the climate system (such as temperature change, changes in rainfall patterns, sea-level rise and storm surge, ocean acidification, changes in ocean currents, etc.);
  2. Indirect (or secondary effects) such as climate-induced changes to invasive species (the abundance, range and vigour of) and land use (includes facilities);
  3. Cumulative impacts;
  4. Anthropogenic impacts exacerbated by climate change (such as pollution, extraction, land-use, sedimentation, etc.);
  5. Impacts from human adaptations and mitigation actions in response to climate change (such as hydro dams, sea walls, etc.).
Commercial hunting

Hunting undertaken by professional hunters for their livelihood and intended to maximise the take or kill of animals. It does not include guided recreational hunting, transportation of recreational hunters, or other means of assistance for recreational hunting for which a consideration is paid (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Community

Any individual or group (whether statutory or non-statutory, formal or informal, commercial or non-commercial) having an interest in a particular conservation issue.

Concession

A lease, licence, permit or easement granted under Section 49 of the National Parks Act and Part 3B of the Conservation Act 1987, section 22 of the Wild Animal Control Act 1977 or section 14AA of the Wildlife Act and includes any activity authorised by the concession document.

A lease, licence, permit or easement granted under Part 3B of the Conservation Act 1987 with reference to section 49 of the National Parks Act 1980, to enable the carrying out of a trade, occupation or business (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Concessionaire

A person granted a concession by the Minister of Conservation for a lease, licence, permit or easement.

Conservation

The preservation and protection of natural and historic resources for the purpose of maintaining their intrinsic values, providing for their appreciation and recreational enjoyment by the public, and safeguarding the options of future generations (Conservation Act 1987, section 2).

Conservation board

Conservation boards are established under section 6L of the Conservation Act 1987. The primary functions and powers of conservation boards are set out in sections 6M and 6N of the Conservation Act 1987 and section 30 of the National Parks Act 1980. Their functions include overseeing the preparation of conservation management strategies and national park management plans for their areas, approval of conservation management plans (e.g. for conservation parks), and advising the New Zealand Conservation Authority or Director-General of the Department of Conservation on conservation matters of importance in their area. They also have an important conservation advocacy role. The relevant conservation board for this Plan is the West Coast Tai Poutini Conservation Board.

Conservation General Policy

A policy prepared under section 17C of the Conservation Act 1987 to provide unified policy for the implementation of Conservation, Wildlife, Marine Reserves, Reserves, Wild Animal Control and Marine Mammals Protection Acts. It provides guidance for the administration and management of all lands and waters and all natural and historic resources managed for the purposes of those Acts, excluding reserves administered by other agencies under the Reserves Act 1977. It also provides guidance for consistent management planning for the wide range of places and resources administered or managed by the Department, including the preparation of conservation management strategies, conservation management plans and sports fish management plans.

Conservation legislation

A term that applies collectively to the statutes administered by the Department, being the Conservation Act 1987 and the legislation listed at Schedule 1 of that Act. These include the Wildlife Act 1953 and the National Parks Act 1980.

Conservation management

Any activity that is carried out by the Minister or the Director-General (and their contractors and authorised agents) in the exercise of their functions, duties, or powers under the conservation legislation.

Conservation management plan

A plan for the management of natural and historic resources and for recreation, tourism and other conservation purposes which implements a conservation management strategy and establishes detailed objectives for integrated management within a place or places specified in a conservation management strategy (derived from Conservation Act 1987, section 17E).

Conservation management strategy

The purpose of a conservation management strategy is to implement general policies and establish objectives for the integrated management of natural and historic resources, including any species managed by the Department under the Wildlife Act 1953, the Marine Reserves Act 1971, the Reserves Act 1977, the Wild Animal Control Act 1977, the Marine Mammals Protection Act 1978, the National Parks Act 1980, the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Act 2000 or the Conservation Act 1987, and for recreation, tourism, and other conservation purposes (Conservation Act 1987, section 17D).

Control line model aircraft

See Aircraft, control line model.

Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)

An international agreement on biological diversity that came into force in December 1993 following a meeting of governments in Rio de Janiero. The objectives of the Convention are the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components, and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilisation of genetic resources.

Convention on Wetlands of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat (Ramsar Convention)

An intergovernmental treaty that provides the framework for national action and international cooperation for the conservation and wise use of wetlands and their resources.

Cultural

Societal values with an emphasis on New Zealand/European history and tikanga Māori that are handed down through the generations (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Cultural materials

Includes plants, plant materials and materials derived from animals (including marine mammals and birds) to the extent to which the Department holds and is responsible for them, and which are important to Ngāi Tahu in maintaining their culture.

Cumulative effect

An effect which arises over time or in combination with other effects (Resource Management Act 1991, section 3).

Customary use

Gathering and use of natural resources by tangata whenua according to tikanga (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

D

Department, the

The Department of Conservation.

Destination Management Framework (DMF)

A programme aimed at increasing the number of people enjoying public conservation lands and waters. It focuses the Department on five key areas for success: understanding what people want; delivering quality experiences; optimising resources; working with others; and improving marketing and promotion. Destinations are a geographic area and/or group of facilities that are the focus of a single typical visitor trip, and are categorised into Icon, Gateway, Local Treasure, and Backcountry destinations. Destination management is the coordinated management of all the elements that make up a destination including its values, attractions, people, infrastructure, access and how the destination is marketed.

Director-General

The Director-General of Conservation.

Disability assist dog

A dog certified by one of the following organisations as being trained to assist (or as being in training to assist) a person with a disability:

  1. Hearing Dogs for Deaf People New Zealand
  2. Mobility Assistance Dogs Trust
  3. New Zealand Epilepsy Assist Dogs Trust
  4. Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind
  5. Assistance Dogs New Zealand
  6. Perfect Partners Assistance Dogs Trust
  7. an organisation specified in an Order in Council made under section 78D

(Dog Control Act 1996, section 2).

Downhill

An extreme form of mountain biking involving riding down steep slopes, including over obstacles, drops and sharp turns, at maximum speed.

E

Ecological integrity

The full potential of indigenous biotic and abiotic factors, and natural processes, functioning in sustainable habitats, ecosystems and landscapes (Conservation General Policy 2005).

Ecosystem

A biological system comprising a community of living organisms and its associated non-living environment, interacting as an ecological unit (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Ecosystem services

A wide range of conditions and processes through which natural ecosystems and the species that are part of them help sustain and fulfil life (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Effect

The term effect includes:

  1. any positive or adverse effect; and
  2. any temporary or permanent effect; and
  3. any past, present, or future effect; and
  4. any cumulative effect which arises over time or in combination with other effects

    regardless of the scale, intensity, duration, or frequency of the effect, and also includes:

  5. any potential effect of high probability; and
  6. any potential effect of low probability which has a high potential impact

(Conservation Act 1987, section 2 and Resource Management Act 1991, section 3).

Electric power-assisted pedal cycle

A pedal cycle to which is attached one or more auxiliary electric propulsion motors having a combined maximum power output of up to 300 watts.

Emergency (for an aircraft)

A situation where a concession is not required in accordance with section 17ZF of the Conservation Act 1987 only as a result of:

  1. a mechanical or structural or operational defect in the aircraft or its equipment; or
  2. weather conditions or other causes not under the control of the pilot in command.
Endemic

A species which is native to, as well as restricted to, a particular natural area (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Eradicate

To remove completely (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Escarpment

A long, steep slope, especially one at the edge of a plateau or separating areas of land at different heights.

F

Facilities

Facilities that enable people to enjoy a range of recreational opportunities including (but not limited to): visitor and information centres, camping areas, tracks and walkways, bridges, huts, roads, car-parking areas, toilets, picnic areas, signs and interpretation panels, viewing platforms, wharves and boat ramps (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Fish

Includes all species of finfish and shellfish, at any stage of their life history, whether living or dead (Fisheries Act 1996).

Fish and Game Council

Statutory body with functions pertaining to the management, maintenance and enhancement of the sports fish and game resource in the recreational interests of anglers and hunters (Conservation Act 1987, section 26Q(1)).

See also Game.

Fishery

One or more stocks or parts of stocks or one or more species of freshwater fish or aquatic life that can be treated as a unit for the purposes of conservation or management (Conservation Act 1987, section 2).

Four-wheel drive road

A road that can be traversed by a four-wheel drive vehicle capable of handling conditions including grade and side slopes, width, surface material, waterway fords, entry and exit angles to fords and depressions, and seasonal snow and ice, without causing adverse effects to the adjoining areas or the road. The road, through maintenance and managed traffic densities and/or seasonal closures, can be retained at this four-wheel drive standard, and can be shared with other vehicles, including trail bikes and mountain bikes.

See also Road.

Free flight model aircraft

See Aircraft, free flight model.

Freshwater fish

Includes finfish and shellfish which must at any time in the life history of the species, inhabit fresh water, and includes finfish and shellfish that seasonally migrate into or out of fresh water (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

G

Game (other than game animal)

Means the wildlife declared to be game specified in the First Schedule to the Wildlife Act 1953. As at the date of the adoption of this Plan, they are all birds, viz: black swan, Canada goose, chukar, grey duck, mallard duck, paradise duck, spoonbill duck, partridge,
red-legged partridge, pheasant, pūkeko, Australian quail, Californian quail and Virginian quail (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Game animal (for the purposes of the Game Animal Council Act 2013 only – see also
Wild animal and Herd of special interest and Overriding considerations)
  1. means:
    1. any chamois, deer, or tahr:
    2. any pig that is living in a wild state and is not being herded or handled as a domestic animal or kept within an effective fence or enclosure for farming purposes; and
  2. includes the whole or any part of the carcass of the animal

(Game Animal Council Act 2013, section 4).

Gateway destination

A destination that helps to introduce New Zealanders to the outdoors and allows them to learn about conservation. These destinations may provide for a diverse range of activities and include many traditional camping and tramping destinations.

General Policy for National Parks

A policy prepared under section 44 of the National Parks Act 1980 to provide unified policy for the implementation of the Act.

Great Walk

A specific category of track (plus the Whanganui River) that provides a multi-day outdoor experience with well-constructed facilities and good information on which a range of concessionaire-provided services may be available, and which are promoted as suitable for less experienced outdoor users seeking the challenge of a multi-day outdoor experience.

Guide dog

See Disability assist dog.

H

Habitat

The environment within which a particular species or group of species lives. It includes the physical and biotic characteristics that are relevant to the species concerned (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Herd of special interest

A species of game animal in a specified area designated by the Minister of Conservation as a herd of special interest under section 16 of the Game Animal Council Act 2013 (Game Animal Council Act 2013, section 4).

Historic and cultural heritage

Any building or other structure, archaeological site, natural feature, wāhi tapu, or object associated with people, traditions, events or ideas, which contributes to an understanding of New Zealand's history and cultures.

Historic area

An area of land that:

  1. contains an inter-related group of historic places; and
  2. forms part of the historical and cultural heritage of New Zealand; and
  3. lies within the territorial limits of New Zealand

(Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014, section 6).

Historic place
  1. Any of the following that forms a part of the historical and cultural heritage of New Zealand and that lies within the territorial limits of New Zealand:
    1. land, including an archaeological site or part of an archaeological site;
    2. a building or structure (or part of a building or structure);
    3. any combination of land, buildings or structures, or associated buildings or structures (or parts of buildings, structures, or associated buildings or structures); and
  2. includes anything that is in or fixed to land described in paragraph (a)

(Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014, section 6).

Historic resource

Means a historic place within the meaning of the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014, and includes any interest in a historic resource (Conservation Act 1987, section 2).

Hover

An aircraft flight at a constant height and position over a surface.

I

Icon destination

A high profile, popular destination that underpins national and international tourism, and provides memorable visitor experiences in New Zealand.

Indigenous species

Plants and animals that initially established in New Zealand without the assistance of human beings, and without the assistance of vehicles or aircraft. This includes species that are unique to New Zealand as well as those that may be found elsewhere in the world. The words 'indigenous' and 'native' have the same meaning in this Plan (based on the General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Integrated conservation management

The management of natural resources, and historical and cultural heritage, and existing or potential activities in a manner which ensures that priorities are clear and that the effects of each activity on others are considered and managed accordingly (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS)

An international, non-governmental organisation of heritage professionals engaged in the conservation of places of cultural heritage value and dedicated to the conservation of the world's historic monuments and sites. ICOMOS international acts as an advisory body to the World Heritage Committee alongside the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) for natural heritage (www.icomos.org.nz, viewed September 2012).

International Council on Monuments and Sites New Zealand Charter, Te Pūmanawa o ICOMOS o Aotearoa hei tiaki i ngā Taonga Whenua Heke Iho o Nehe

A set of guidelines on cultural heritage conservation, produced by ICOMOS New Zealand. The New Zealand Charter is widely used in the New Zealand heritage sector and forms a recognised benchmark for conservation standards and practice. It is used by central government ministries and departments, by local bodies in district plans and heritage management, and by practitioners as guiding principles (www.icomos.org.nz/nzcharters.html, viewed September 2012).

Interpretation

Conveying information about the origin, meaning or values of natural, historic or cultural heritage via live, interactive or static media in a way that stimulates interest, increased understanding and support for conservation.

Intrinsic value

A concept which regards the subject under consideration as having value or worth in its own right, independent of any value placed on it by humans (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

K

Kaitiaki

Guardian (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Kaitiakitanga

The exercise of guardianship by the tangata whenua of an area in accordance with tikanga. In relation to a resource this includes the ethic of stewardship based upon the nature of the resource itself (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Karst

Terrane usually underlain by limestone, in which the topography is chiefly formed by the dissolving of rock and which may be characterised by sinkholes, sinking streams, closed depressions, subterranean drainage and caves.

L

Limited access road

Limited access roads are sections of state highway usually bordered by residential or commercial properties that can only be accessed from authorised crossing points.

Local treasure destination

Locally important vehicle-accessible location that provides recreation opportunities for, and grows connections with, nearby communities.

M

Mahinga kai

The customary gathering of food and natural materials and the places where those resources are gathered (based on Ngāi Tahu Claims Settlement Act 1998, section 167).

Mana

Prestige, authority (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Mana whenua

Customary authority exercised by an iwi or hapū or individual in an identified area (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Mātauranga Māori

Māori traditional knowledge (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Mauri

Essential life force, the spiritual power and distinctiveness that enables each thing to exist as itself (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Milestone

A specific action that is a measurable step towards achieving an objective or outcome.

Mining
  1. means to take, win, or extract, by whatever means:
    1. a mineral existing in its natural state in land; or
    2. a chemical substance from a mineral existing in its natural state in land; and
  2. includes:
    1. the injection of petroleum into an underground gas storage facility; and
    2. the extraction of petroleum from an underground gas storage facility; but
  3. does not include prospecting or exploration for a mineral or chemical substance referred to in paragraph (a)

(Crown Minerals Act 1991, section 2).

Motor vehicle (includes motorised vehicle)

A vehicle drawn or propelled by mechanical power. This includes an over-snow vehicle and a trailer, but does not include:

  1. a vehicle running on rails; or
  2. a trailer (other than a trailer designed solely for the carriage of goods) that is designed and used exclusively as part of the armament of the New Zealand Defence Force; or
  3. a trailer running on one wheel and designed exclusively as a speed measuring device or for testing the wear of vehicle tyres; or
  4. a vehicle designed for amusement purposes and used exclusively within a place of recreation, amusement or entertainment to which the public does not have access with motor vehicles; or
  5. a pedestrian-controlled machine; or
  6. a vehicle that the Agency has declared under section 168A is not a motor vehicle; or
  7. a mobility device

(Land Transport Act 1998, section 2).

For the purpose of this Plan, a motor vehicle does not include any electric power-assisted pedal cycles.

Note: any motor vehicle (which includes trail and quad bikes, over-snow vehicles) taken onto public conservation lands must be registered and/or licensed, where it is required to be registered and/or licenced under the Land Transport Act 1998.

Mountain bikes

A colloquial term for a non-powered or non-motorised bicycle that can be used off formed roads.

N

National park lands and waters

All land included in a national park where land may include the foreshore, and the bed of the stream, river, tarn or lake and other permanent water bodies, such as peat bogs, wetlands and tidal waters that flow through that area of a national park within the coastal marine area.

It is a matter of legal fact in the case of each national park whether or not 'park lands' include foreshore and sea bed areas; not all foreshores and sea beds surrounded by or adjoining a national park will have the status of national park (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Native

Indigenous (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Natural

Existing in or produced by nature (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Natural character

The qualities of an area which are the result of natural processes and, taken together, give it a particular recognisable character. These qualities may be ecological, physical, spiritual or aesthetic in nature (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Natural quiet

Natural ambient conditions in a natural area; the sounds of nature (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Natural resources

Plants and animals of all kinds; and the air, water, and soil in or on which any plant or animal lives or may live; and landscape and landform; and geological features; and systems of interacting living organisms, and their environment; and includes any interest in a natural resource (Conservation Act 1987, section 2).

Natural state

Unmodified by human activity or introduced plants or animals (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

New Zealand Biodiversity Strategy

A government-approved national strategy (2000) providing an integrated response to New Zealand's declining indigenous biodiversity, prepared in part to meet a commitment under the Convention on Biological Diversity (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Ngāi Tahu

The iwi of Ngāi Tahu, consisting of the collective of individuals who descend from the primary hapū of Waitaha, Ngāti Māmoe and Ngāi Tahu being: Ngāti Kurī, Ngāti Irakehu, Kāti Huirapa, Ngāi Tūāhuriri and Kāi Te Ruahikihiki.

Ngā taonga tūturu

Means two or more taonga tūturu.

Ngāti Waewae

Hapū (sub-tribe) of the iwi Ngāi Tahu.

O

Open access caves

Caves not specifically identified as restricted or partially restricted access caves.

Outcome

A goal or end result of a conservation action or series of actions (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Overriding considerations (for the purposes of the Game Animal Council Act 2013)
  1. the welfare and management of public conservation land and resources generally:
  2. any statement of general policy that is made, or has effect as if it were made, under:
    1. section 17B of the Conservation Act 1987
    2. section 44 of the National Parks Act 1980
    3. section 15A of the Reserves Act 1977
    4. section 14C of the Wildlife Act 1953
  3. any conservation management strategy made under section 17D of the Conservation Act 1987:
  4. any conservation management plan made under:
    1. section 17E of the Conservation Act 1987
    2. section 40B of the Reserves Act 1977
  5. any management plan made under:
    1. section 47 of the National Parks Act 1980
    2. section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977
  6. Any wild animal control plan made under section 5 of the Wild Animal
    Control Act 1977:
  7. Any pest management strategy, pest management plan, pathway management plan or operational plan made under the Biosecurity Act 1993

(Game Animal Council Act 2013, section 4).

P

Papatipu Rūnanga

Means the Papatipu Rūnanga of Ngāi Tahu Whānui referred to in Section 9 of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu Act 1996.

Participation

The contribution of effort, information and ideas towards the discharge and attainment of the Department's work (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Partnerships

The relationship between individuals or groups that is characterised by mutual cooperation and responsibility for the achievement of a specific goal (General Policy for National
Parks 2005).

People and organisations

An inclusive phrase used to refer to all individuals, clubs, companies, councils and other organisations and groups both public and private, with an interest in the policies and actions undertaken by the Department in relation to species and public conservation lands and waters (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Personal mobility device

A device designed to transport one person is propelled by hand or a propulsion system with a maximum speed of 15 km per hour, and is ridden by a disabled person (General Policy for National Parks 2005). For the purposes of this Plan, this does not include power-assisted cycles.

Pest

Any organism, including an animal, plant, pathogen or disease, capable or potentially capable of causing unwanted harm or posing significant risks to indigenous species, habitats and ecosystems or freshwater fisheries (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Place

An area identified in this Plan for the purposes of integrated conservation management. It may include any combination of terrestrial, freshwater and marine areas and may be determined by a range of criteria including but not limited to: ecological districts, geological features, catchments, internal departmental, regional or district council or rohe/takiwā boundaries, land status, major recreation or tourism destinations, commonality of management considerations, unique management needs (General Policy for National Parks 2005). For the purposes of this Plan, the Places are Nīkau, Tī Kōuka, Mānuka and Horoeka.

Polje (pronounced 'poll-yer')

An extensive depression having a flat-floor and steep walls but no outflowing surface stream and found in a region having karst topography.

Pounamu

Means:

  1. bowenite:
  2. nephrite, including semi-nephrite:
  3. serpentine, including that occurring in its natural condition in the land described in the Schedule of the Ngāi Tahu (Pounamu Vesting) Act 1997.
Power-assisted cycle

A power-assisted cycle is a pedal cycle that has an electric motor of up to 300 watts.

See also Electric power-assisted pedal cycle.

Precautionary approach

Taking a cautious approach to conservation management decisions when information is uncertain, unreliable or inadequate.

Preservation

In relation to a resource, means the maintenance, so far as is practicable, of its intrinsic values (Conservation Act 1987, section 2).

Priority ecosystem unit

An ecosystem identified through the Department's natural heritage prioritising processes as being one of the most effective places to work to ensure that a nationally representative range of ecosystems is protected to a healthy functioning state.

Protected areas

Terrestrial, freshwater and marine areas that are protected primarily for the purposes contained in the conservation legislation, including the conservation of natural resources and historical and cultural heritage, using a range of legal mechanisms that provide long-term security of tenure, status or land use purpose, either privately or publicly owned (based on Conservation General Policy 2005).

Protection

In relation to a resource, means its maintenance, so far as is practicable, in its current state; but includes:

  1. its restoration to some former state; and
  2. its augmentation, enhancement, or expansion

(Conservation Act 1987, section 2).

Public accommodation

Place to live or lodge that is open to or shared by all people (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Public conservation lands and waters

Lands and water areas administered by the Department of Conservation for their respective legislative purpose, including the preservation and protection of natural and historic resources of those areas covered by this Plan.

R

Recreational freshwater fisheries

Any freshwater fishery where the fishing of sports fish and indigenous freshwater fish is lawfully carried out for recreational purposes (Conservation General Policy 2005).

Regulations

A Regulation made by the Governor-General, by Order in Council, under the relevant section of the conservation legislation.

Rahui

A restriction or control of specified activities put in place by the tangata whenua as kaitiaki to manage an area in accordance with tikanga.

Rangatiratanga

Chieftainship, the exercise of tribal authority.

Related facilities

Any structure or piece of equipment used in conjunction or association with accommodation. Examples include garages, outhouses and outdoor showers.

Remotely piloted aircraft

See Aircraft, remotely piloted.

Restoration

The active intervention and management of modified or degraded habitats, ecosystems, landforms and landscapes to restore indigenous natural character, ecological and physical processes and their cultural and visual qualities; or for historic heritage, to return a place as nearly as possible to a known earlier state (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Road

Means:

  1. a road that is formed and maintained for vehicle use by the public;
  2. a route that is marked by the Department for vehicle use by the public or identified in a conservation management strategy or conservation management plan for use by vehicles generally or for a particular type of vehicle (for example a bicycle) or as a vehicle parking area (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

A road includes any tunnel, bridge, ford, rail, watercraft, viaduct or other feature which forms part of a way that is formed or maintained for vehicle use. A road may or may not pass over a defined legal road.

See also Four-wheel drive road.

Rohe

Geographical territory of an iwi or hapū (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

S

Site

A defined area within a wider place (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Species

A group of organisms that has evolved distinct common inheritable features and occupies a particular geographical range, and which is capable of interbreeding freely, but not with members of other species (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Sports fish

Every species of freshwater fish that the Governor-General may declare to be sports fish for the purposes of the Conservation Act 1987; examples are trout and salmon (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Statement of Intent (SOI)

A document that sets out a rolling 4-year direction for the Department. Its primary purpose is to enable Ministers, select committees and the central and audit agencies that support them to assess the Department's performance.

Structure

Any building, equipment, device, or other facility made by people and which is fixed to land; and includes any raft (Resource Management Act 1991, section 2).

T

Takiwā

Place or territory used by or associated with an iwi, hapū or whānau (Conservation General Policy 2005).

Tangata whenua

Iwi or hapū that has customary authority in a place (General Policy for National
Parks 2005).

Taonga

Valued resources or prized possessions held by Māori, both material and non-material.
It is a broad concept that includes tangible and intangible aspects of natural and historic resources of significance to Māori, including wāhi tapu and intellectual property (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Taonga species

Species of birds, plants, mammals and fish described in Schedule 97 of the Ngāi Tahu Claims Settlement Act 1998 and found within the Ngāi Tahu claim area.

Taonga tūturu

Defined in the Protected Objects Act 1975 and means an object that –

  1. relates to Maori culture, history, or society; and
  2. was, or appears to have been
    1. manufactured or modified in New Zealand by Maori; or
    2. brought into New Zealand by Maori; or
    3. used by Maori; and
  3. is more than 50 years old.
Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu

The representative tribal body of Ngāi Tahu whānui which was established as a body corporate on 20 April 1996 under section 6 of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu Act 1996.

Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae

Representative body of a Ngāi Tahu Papatipu Rūnanga.

Threatened (species)

Includes all species categorised as 'Nationally Critical', 'Nationally Endangered' or 'Nationally Vulnerable' under the New Zealand Threat Classification System.

Tikanga

Customary values and practices related to specific iwi and hapū (General Policy for National Parks 2005).

Truncated spur

A truncated spur is a spur that descends towards a valley floor or coastline from a higher elevation that ends in an inverted-V face. They are produced by the erosion truncation of the spur by the action of streams, waves, or glaciers.

U

Utilities

Includes but not limited to these facilities based over or under the ground: structures and infrastructure for telecommunications; energy generation and transmission; sewerage; water supply and flood control; oil and gas; roads and airstrips; hydrological and weather stations (based on General Policy for National Parks 2005).

V

Vehicle
  1. means a contrivance equipped with wheels, tracks or revolving runners on which it moves or is moved; and
  2. includes a hovercraft, a skateboard, in-line skates and roller skates; but does not include:
    1. A perambulator or pushchair:
    2. A shopping or sporting trundler not propelled by mechanical power:
    3. A wheelbarrow or hand-trolley:
    4. A pedestrian-controlled lawnmower:
    5. A pedestrian-controlled agricultural machine not propelled by mechanical power:
    6. An article of furniture:
    7. A wheelchair not propelled by mechanical power:
    8. Any other contrivance specified by the rules not to be a vehicle for the purposes of this definition:
    9. Any rail vehicle

(based on Land Transport Act 1998, section 2).

Note: any motor vehicle (which includes trail and quad bikes and over-snow vehicles) taken onto public conservation land must be registered and/or licensed where it is required to be registered and/or licensed under the Land Transport Act 1998.

Visitor

For the purpose of this Plan, visitors are people using areas and facilities managed by the Department. They include adults and children from New Zealand and overseas, and they may either arrange their own visit or use the services of a concessionaire.

W

Wāhi tapu

A place sacred to Māori in the traditional, spiritual, religious, ritual or mythological sense (Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014, section 6).

Wetlands

Permanent or intermittently wet areas, shallow water or land-water margins. They include swamps, bogs, estuaries, braided rivers and lake margins (General Policy for National
Parks 2005).

Wild animal

Has the meaning set out in the Wild Animal Control Act 1977 and includes: deer, tahr, wild goats, wild pigs and chamois. It does not include an animal that is part of a herd designated to be a herd of special interest under section 16 of the Game Animal Council Act 2013 (Wild Animal Control Act 1977, section 2).

See also Game Animal.

Wildlife

Any animal (as defined as in the Wildlife Act 1953) that is living in a wild state; and includes any such animal or egg or offspring of any such animal held or hatched or born in captivity, whether pursuant to an authority granted under the Wildlife Act 1953 or otherwise; but does not include wild animals subject to the Wild Animal Control Act 1977 (Wildlife Act 1953, section 2).

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