Lake Hāwea
PHOTO: Karin Noresten | DOC

Introduction

This provides access to one of the Hāwea Conservation Park's most beautiful areas, the Hunter Valley.

Track overview

Return via same track

Walking and tramping

10 - 12 hr Advanced: Tramping track

Mountain biking

6 - 8 hr Advanced: Grade 4

Dog access

No dogs

About this track

Description

Looking toward the head of Lake Hāwea and the Hunter River valley from Corner Peak.
Looking toward the head of Lake Hāwea and the Hunter River valley from Corner Peak

This undulating track leads from the Turihuka Conservation Area and provides excellent lake and mountain views. It fords the Dingle Burn and goes on to the Hunter River/Lake Hāwea confluence.

Along the river flats the track weaves in and out of pockets of kānuka and silver/tahina and mountain/tamauka beech forest.

The Hunter Valley's open grasslands and braided river system lie beneath the McKerrow, Young and Huxley Ranges.

After entering the Hunter Valley follow the extensive valley flats to gain access to gain access to the head of the valley.

It is spectacular ride along Lake Hāwea toward the head of the lake. A variety of terrain raises this track category to Advanced.

Getting there

The Hunter River. Photo: F Gaud.
The Hunter River

From Hāwea Township, follow the unsealed Dingleburn Station Road to the public carpark. No vehicle access permitted beyond this point.

From the carpark, walk or bicycle along the 4WD road until a new access track for foot and mountain bike traffic leads to the Turihuka Conservation Area, on to the Lake Hāwea /Hunter River confluence and access to the Hāwea Conservation Park.

The Long Flat Creek swing bridge in the Hunter Valley has been permanently removed.

Know before you go

Adverse weather: The weather can change rapidly in New Zealand. Hypothermia is a real risk even in summer. Be prepared by having warm, windproof clothing and the appropriate footwear. Whiteout conditions caused by snow or low cloud may be present.

Be avalanche alert: This area has terrain that can produce avalanches that cross the track, usually from May into November. View avalanche information.

Unbridged rivers: There are river and stream crossings that become hazardous in heavy rain or snowmelt. Be prepared to turn back.

Private property: This track crosses private land. Respect the landowner's livestock and property: stay on the marked track until you reach the conservation land, leave gates as you find them and use stiles where provided. Livestock can be unpredictable – keep your distance at all times/go around if necessary. 

No camping until the conservation area boundary.

Before you go into the outdoors, tell someone your plans and leave a date to raise the alarm if you haven't returned. To do this, use the New Zealand Outdoors Intentions process on the AdventureSmart website. It is endorsed by New Zealand's search and rescue agencies and provides three simple options to tell someone you trust the details about your trip.

Contacts

Tititea / Mount Aspiring National Park Visitor Centre
Phone:   +64 3 443 7660
Email:   mtaspiringvc@doc.govt.nz
Address:   Ardmore Street
Wanaka 9305
Full office details
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