Introduction

Take a 20-minute walk in Waipoua Forest to view the world’s second largest living kauri 'Te Matua Ngahere'.

Track overview

730 m

Walking and tramping

20 min one way Easiest: Short walk

Dog access

Dogs with a DOC permit only. Contact the relevant DOC office to obtain a permit.

  • Kauri dieback

    Help stop kauri dieback

    Kauri dieback disease is killing our native kauri. It spreads by soil movement, but you can help prevent it.

    • Stay away from kauri tree roots.
    • Clean your gear before and after visiting kauri forest.

About this track

Description

Te Matua Ngahere.
Visitor standing at the base of the kauri
'Te Matua Ngahere'

A 20-minute walk leads you to 'Te Matua Ngahere' (Father of the Forest) – the second largest living kauri tree in New Zealand.

The walk is well-surfaced with metal or boardwalk. It is suitable for push prams and wheelchairs, although wheelchair users may need assistance in some areas.

You can admire the tree on a viewing platform without damaging its sensitive root systems.

Getting there

The Te Matua Ngahere Walk is sign posted 'Kauri Walks' from State Highway 12, which runs through the Waipoua Forest.

From the car park, you will see a sign for the three walks 'Te Matua Ngahere', 'Four Sisters', and 'Yakas Kauri'.

A track meanders through native bush and brings you to a central point from which you can access the three walks. From here Te Matua Ngahere Walk is very well sign posted and located directly in the middle of this open space.

Nature and conservation

You get an opportunity to experience many aspects of this dynamic forest system. The forest type varies from almost pure kauri stands to mixed podocarp/hardwood, with kauri grass, kiekie, neinei and ferns in the understorey.

It is very important that you keep to the walking track at all times. Kauri trees have very sensitive surface roots, and foot traffic around the trees endangers their life span.

About Te Matua Ngahere

'Te Matua Ngahere' (Father of the Forest) is the second largest living kauri tree in New Zealand. He is also noted as being the oldest out of the two largest living kauri trees and is estimated to exceed 2,000 years. He was discovered by Nicholas Yakas in 1928 when he and other men were working to build the road that is now known as State Highway 12.

Measurements:

  • Trunk girth: 16.41 m
  • Trunk height: 10.21 m
  • Total height: 29.9 m
  • Trunk volume: 208.1 m³

Know before you go

  • Keep to the track at all times.
  • Security is maintained in this car park by a $2.00 donation during the day to the car park ambassador.
  • No domestic pets are allowed on this track.

Safety

  • In strong winds, beware of falling branches.

Contacts

Te Tai Kauri / Kauri Coast Office
Phone:      +64 9 439 3450
Email:   dargaville@doc.govt.nz
Full office details
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