Introduction

A Te Runanga o Ngati Porou Trainee Cadets partnership with Department of Conservation (DOC) has proven to be a successful initiative.

Date:  18 May 2010

A Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou Trainee Cadets partnership with Department of Conservation (DOC) has proven to be a successful initiative. Two East Coast men Hori Katipa and Te Kani Haenga have been selected from 109 applicants nationwide for the Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology Trainee Ranger Programme. 

Gisborne Whakatane Area Manager, Andy Bassett says the two cadets salary was paid by Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou while they worked for DOC. DOC is committed to working with Ngati Porou and building capability to provide them with conservation related skills that are transferable to their hapu, whanau and iwi. 

“This is an excellent example of how DOC and Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou have been working together to achieve a joint conservation outcome. I am pleased that Hori and Te Kani have been selected for the Trainee Ranger Programme. There are long-term benefits with these types of ventures in educating young people, working with the community and we are hoping to continue the Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou Trainee Cadets programme in the future.” says Mr Bassett.

“Economic prosperity is at the heart of what we strive for with our people,” says Monty Soutar, the Chief Executive of Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou. “Collaborative initiatives such as this will lead to better employment opportunities for men like Hori and Te Kani and to this end we will continue to support DOC with such proposals.”

The focus of the cadets work was on the East Coast with Hal Hovell based at Te Araroa and Graeme Atkins at Ruatoria. Some of their work included learning about culturally important kereru grounds, plantings and identification of different plants and tree species. Highlights of their training have included the opportunity to experience a two week placement with Nga Whenua Rahui, assisting at the DIY Marae at Potaka Marae on the East Coast in March and Grey Face Petrel monitoring on Whangaokena (East Island). 

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